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Joined
Jun 22, 2014
Messages
28
Location
Portland Oregon USA
This is where I'll post about my indoor collection. I decided to be so public with it because I am very serious about making it better (all within means of course!). I recently lost a great many of my older plants, though a few decade + ones survived my year off at university. As I plan on keeping closer to home for the next year or so, I've devoted much energy and time to reconfigure what I had into what I have now. Please offer any help you can to get me back on my feet!
All images are links to my Flickr.
My growing room is the sunroom, facing west. It is the only room available to me at the moment. It is a very pretty room, and the light later in the day is dramatically gold. All fluorescent lighting, t8s. They've got less lumens/watt, but they seem to give more color to the plants than the t5s. Temperature in the daytime is roughly 77-80 degrees. Humidity varies. At tray level, humidity can be in the 60% range, but 40-30% is more common. Photoperiod is about 15 hours.

These are my shelves away from the window. Closer to us is the propagation shelf for my D. regia (plant is outside). There is also a single P. gigantea plantlet growing in the adjacent tray.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/124993450@N07/14353248279/in/photostream/

These lumps of sphagnum contain my D. regia root cuttings. Am I doing it right?
https://www.flickr.com/photos/124993450@N07/14353248309/in/photostream/

P. gigantea plantlet. Sphagnum should be ok for this little guy...
https://www.flickr.com/photos/124993450@N07/14559977923/in/photostream/

P. gigantea in foreground, and P. "Titan" on the periphery of a gigantic clumping ping in the back bowl. Identity of that particular ping is unknown.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/124993450@N07/14353214510/in/photostream/

From the back: ping pullings in sphagnum, two D. affinis that I recieved a few days ago bare-root, a "mexican" ping that I just bought and just started turning red. The pot on the right in the foreground was D. madagascariensis but now houses my last remaining non-aphid-infested D. occidentalis x pulchella, my all-time favorite plant, pictured in the second link.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/124993450@N07/14516740926/in/photostream/

Pings moranensis (letter unknown - do they still use that lettering system?) in the middle, aphrodite on the right, and rotundiflora on the left.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/124993450@N07/14516740986/in/photostream/

Propagation in domes of seeds and cuttings. Currently D. binata, D. burmanii "red giant", D. sessifolia, and D. rupicola, though D. rupicola seed probably requires stratification, which I have not done yet. Cuttings of D. occidentalis x pulchella.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/124993450@N07/14559977633/in/photostream/

Neps and phalaenopsis orchids, with an onion in the far back (it looks like a scarecrow with all the straw). Neps are N. fusca, N. ventricosa, N. sanguinea red and orange varieties, N. maxima, N. x "kohala", N. ventricosa x inermis, and something red I cannot identify.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/124993450@N07/14539849765/in/photostream/

Mondi Domed Tray containing cephalotus, N. truncata, and N. bicalcarata. Yes, I'm growing cephalotus like a lowland nep.
https://www.flickr.com/photos/124993450@N07/14538891522/in/photostream/
https://www.flickr.com/photos/124993450@N07/14559977433/in/photostream/

Heh, thanks for reading through all that! Any tips appreciated.
 
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Zath

Enthusiastic Enthusiast
Joined
May 24, 2014
Messages
584
Location
VA, USA
Despite having suffered so many losses, you still have quite the respectable collection there.

I'm loving the last pics. I've wondered how best to use those large plastic tubs before, but it never occurred to me to flip them over. *facepalm*

Good repurposing.
 

Dragoness

For the love of Science!
Joined
Jun 8, 2014
Messages
516
Location
Oakland County, Michigan
It never occurred to me that I could get small trays/cups at work with clear covers like that for making mini humidity domes for seedlings and germination.
 

Dragoness

For the love of Science!
Joined
Jun 8, 2014
Messages
516
Location
Oakland County, Michigan
My ceph did very well grown in with my lowland neps for a few years, growing in pure spag. Then I re potted it, using the recipe recommended by "The Savage Garden" and it seemed to die practically overnight. Not sure if the sand wasn't clean enough or what...
 

Bio

Plant Whisperer
Joined
Mar 20, 2014
Messages
514
Location
SC
Cephs don't really mind a wide range of temperature, as long as their basic needs are met. I have one clone that I grew outside next to Sarracenia for the entire summer. For those who don't know, day temps here can get well over 95 in the day, with low humidity. The same clone is now thriving just as well in highland conditions. If it is grown that warm though, it should get decent temperature drops at night to avoid sudden collapse of the plant.
 
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Joined
Jun 22, 2014
Messages
28
Location
Portland Oregon USA
The situation in the sunroom is curious. The carpet and the lamps, as well as the western sun keep the room well in the 80s in June, sometimes higher in July-early September. Night-time drops are steep, and quick, down 20 degrees in about two hours. I keep a small fan at the entrance. The lack of a door is very effective in keeping the temperature cooler at night.

I've noticed very little about my little cephalotus. It's my pet rock that I left in a terrarium for 6 years without touching it once. I didn't even water it. Not that it's an optimal plant, so I'd be interested in getting it into a more vigorous, preferably redder state.

I would also like to know if nepenthes can be easily transplanted without risk of major setback, specifically concerning that N. truncata.

Yes! Flipping over tubs is a great idea. I have little experience with a more glazed plastic, but I do know growers who have a hard time sustaining neps without totally transparency. The glazed feel on that dome is all condensation, in case there was any confusion. Humidity within those domes is probably 100%. I'll need to get some instruments to detect those numbers more clearly though.

Bio: why a steep temp drop in accordance with high daytime temps? What would more moderate daytime temps call for at night?
 
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