D. schizandra photos

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Nov 19, 2007
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Central Fl. USA.
Hello Everyone,

Since most of the world is frozen now, I figured a few quick shots of my D. schizandra might warm folks up a bit.... :)

So far, the largest is hitting the 6 inch (15 cm) diameter mark.

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Stay Warm!

Brian
 

adnedarn

I'm growing CPs in the Desert of Tucson, Az
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Beautiful plants Brian! Care to share some cultivation techniques? I had some doing fairly well, before my cooler failed and I cooked most of them at 140f+ but I have one at about 1/4" I'm trying to revive. :X
Andrew
 
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Thanks everyone!
I do believe in feeding, especially with D. schizandra as I can definitely tell the difference!

Here's a few growth tips for this picky "sister"... Feeding; I use a primordial soup of sorts, consisting of crushed fresh (frozen) bloodworms mixed with a little RO water and the "soup" is applied to the leaves with an eyedropper every two weeks. The liquid is absorbed directly, without risk of mold and each leaf gets two drops of liquid only.

Media; Loose live sphagnum with a little perlite. I do not allow the media to become compacted, as the roots seem to like it a bit airy. I prefer shallow, wide pots to allow surface room for plantlets to be created from the adventurious roots. This also helps to keep things cool.

Watering; I've heard of some growing them wet and some folks growing them drier. Here in tropical Florida, mine respond best when the media is kept just barely damp at all times. I may water once every week or two and never saturate the compost. Just enough to keep the dampness present... and nothing more. I also grow them inside under a T5 lighting system on a red and blue spectrum bulb mix, in one of my Heliamphora chambers. Photoperiod is 12 hours with bulbs residing 12 inches or better above the plants.


Humidity; 100% at all times. I grow mine in a large glass punchbowl that is covered at all times with a clear glass punchbowl. Without high 90-100% humidity, my plants begin to suffer within days. One of the biggest signs is plants whose leaves keep getting smaller and smaller, along with less dew and withered tentacles/glands.

Temperatures; Winter = 60F - 73 F. They grow best in Winter for me. Summer = 72F - 78F. I never let them go above 80F at any given time. In my conditions, it doesn't work. I have to constantly think "highlander" to be successful... ; ) I also grow D. prolifera the same way with great results, although they tolerate temps above 80F much better.

I hope these tips help those interested in growing this magnificent gem!

Happy Growing,

Brian
 

adnedarn

I'm growing CPs in the Desert of Tucson, Az
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Thank you Brian! Joseph had also mentioned that he noticed great increases in the plant when he fed them, come to think of it, his too was in bags where the humidity was very high. This is an older picture but I think it is the last one I had of my plants before the disaster...

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Now I have this from the green pot, all in the black pot are gone.

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Maybe I'll give your feeding solution a try on one of them and see if it sizes up quicker than the others, since I have some fresh frozen (not freeze dried) blood worms for feeding my killies. My humidity is not as high as yours, but my temps are quite a bit cooler.

Andrew
 

thez_yo

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Not quite the same topic but related, does the same thing happen with D. prolifera and D. adelae? (ie. should I be force feeding them instead of letting them do their thing with whatever's flying around?)
 
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Hi Brian,
Thanks for sharing great pics of some very healthy, well-grown plants!
I do believe in feeding, especially with D. schizandra as I can definitely tell the difference!
Ditto. For years, I grew them and they wouldn't get past 3-4" iirc but once I started feeding, the size increased dramatically (and they flowered for the 1st time).

Here's a few growth tips for this picky "sister"... Feeding; I use a primordial soup of sorts, consisting of crushed fresh (frozen) bloodworms mixed with a little RO water and the "soup" is applied to the leaves with an eyedropper every two weeks. The liquid is absorbed directly, without risk of mold and each leaf gets two drops of liquid only.
Wow! I need to try this and see if I also get no mold! That would be fantastic!

Watering; I've heard of some growing them wet and some folks growing them drier. Here in tropical Florida, mine respond best when the media is kept just barely damp at all times. I may water once every week or two and never saturate the compost. Just enough to keep the dampness present... and nothing more. I also grow them inside under a T5 lighting system on a red and blue spectrum bulb mix, in one of my Heliamphora chambers. Photoperiod is 12 hours with bulbs residing 12 inches or better above the plants.
More good info - thanks! I'll need to try keeping some with less-wet conditions.

Very interesting on the lighting also. I had a tough time keeping the plant cool if the lighting was that close. Looking at your plant from the auction (same plant - right?), the increased light intensity seems to make the leaves less elongated / wider - a nice look. :hail:

Temperatures; Winter = 60F - 73 F. They grow best in Winter for me. Summer = 72F - 78F. I never let them go above 80F at any given time. In my conditions, it doesn't work. I have to constantly think "highlander" to be successful... ; )
Each summer my plants struggle even though i keep them in the basement all summer. If mine regularly see temps around 78*F, I can expect at least some to crash (Hmmm, maybe because mine are kept 'wetter'??)

I also grow D. prolifera the same way with great results, although they tolerate temps above 80F much better.
D. prolifera is a much more tolerant plant for me. I allow plants to grow in the live LFS between pots in my tanks and they soon grow everywhere. Since they are not as aggressive as D. adelae, there's no real worries about them showing up where they are not wanted. I suspect that they would love to grow in the top dressing of live LFS in highland / intermediate Nep pots...

I hope these tips help those interested in growing this magnificent gem!
Absolutely! Thanks for the info - much appreciated!
 
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Very nice advice Brian! Considering the woodland nature of this species, the loose medium makes a lot of sense. I had the best results in a similar medium as yours, although I added some leaf mould. Mine did best in larger pots and mine were kept wetter so that there would be a good evaporation rate. Feeding was always a problem due to fungus issues from spent prey so I used a dilute orchid fertilizer spray. I can tell you, although not from personal experience alas that individual leaves of this plant can be as big as grapefruit half - the example I saw was grown in low light (like 1 40 watt grotube) deliberately and then periodically and carefully exposed to harder conditions to toughen the leaf epidermis, then returned to low light in a continuing cycle.

All the sisters will respond to these protocols, and feeding is probably best done with care for their sensitivities. Drosera adelae grows new leaves quickly, but D. prolifera and D. schizandra are slower growing, and they need their leaves to be kept safe. Feeding seems especially important for these woodland species otherwise they just don't grow.

These are very beautiful plants. The ones you see in habitat are always covered with litter, and they probably extract nutrients from that too, possibly more than prey even.
 
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Brian, I've trying to find a way to speed up the previously tedious process of feeding all my sundews by taking crushed Beta pellets and individually tweezering small amounts of powder onto the leaves (while trying to drop as few pieces of food as possible), and your eyedropper method is exactly what I've been looking for.
It took 1/4 as long to feed them all!

Also, thanks, everyone, for sharing all the valuable info!
 
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Hey Everyone!

Thanks for sharing your photos and grow tips with me also, i do appreciate it!

Ron, yes that is the same plant that I won from the auction early last year. It did go through a slight sulking period for about a month or so before accepting my conditions and beginning growth once again. I do see what you mean as you stated to me prior, about the leaves getting so large they touch the edges of the glass covering and turn downwards. I'm currently shopping for two larger punchbowls! :-O

TD, thanks for your info as well. I may try moving it to a less-intense lighting area to see if I can pack on some more size. I'd love to hit the 8 inch diameter mark with these babies if possible... :drool:

I'll keep everyone updated on the outcome.

Happy 2011 to All,

Brian
 
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