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thez_yo

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I don't define full potential as in situ. You just seem to think I do. Full potential comes from both optimally meeting the organism's biological needs, (which in situ growing may or may not provide), and preventing the setbacks that are part of a "natural" existence.

Excellent, you're the proverbial 'they'! Can you tell us how you think we should be growing our plants?
 

adnedarn

I'm growing CPs in the Desert of Tucson, Az
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Just wanted to give this a +1. Agree totally.

Have you seen the new mod to the forum that allows you to "like this post" or "Thank! for this informational post"? Find the option directly below the post you want to give it to, and click the one that corresponds correctly.

Andrew
 
Joined
Dec 2, 2014
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Location
Cary, North Carolina
I do attempt to emulate their environments; but they are a bit more tolerant than most believe. It does get cold at altitude in SE Asia; and I once had a partially filled nalgene water bottle freeze, while camping in Borneo near 3000 meters . . .


I have to try growing these plants; the only thing holding me back was the supposed difficulty. I would probably eventually upgrade to a greenhouse that is cooled in the summer and heated in the winter, but for now-- The species I'd like to try grow SLOW. So I wouldn't be expecting a plant to reach its fullest potential in my hands anyway.

You and Thez_yo have convinced me. I'm at least going to buy a couple cheap Wistuba Macrophylla and Lowii clones; I can always sell/trade them to someone with a better setup if they begin to decline.
 

Dexenthes

Aristoloingulamata
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Dec 6, 2008
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Southern Tongass Rainforest, Alaska
I think that for most of these carnivorous plants the real mitigating factor is probably sunlight. I have tried experimenting with growing various genus' either in terrariums (with and without lights), on windowsills, outside and in greenhouses. Here in SE Alaska, lower night time temperatures are never an issue, humidity is never an issue BUT available light IS an issue. A D. capensis or N. ventricosa can survive on a naturally lit windowsill here and survive, but it will barely grow and only pitcher or look somewhat healthy in the summer. With a little artificial lighting it seems that MOST carnivorous plants will grow just fine anywhere you put them. (within reason).

As a terrarium grower I have constantly heard people say, "no you can't grow that plant in a terrarium for any extended amount of time as it will quickly out grow your enclosure." I have found that for the majority of Nepenthes species (especially), that this is just not true. The plants can stay quite small and quite manageable for several years. Though, if you wish to see them flower they will need to move on eventually, but for most people, a couple of years isn't really a short amount of time. Very vigorous Nepenthes hybrids WILL usually outgrow terrariums within a year or several months though, that is true.

On the other end of the spectrum - it blows my mind that there are people that can't keep plants alive at all, considering how forgiving most plant species really are. :banana2:
 

vraev

Carnivorous plant enthusiast
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Great post Zu. I remember back in the day when I started, it was widely considered negative to have VFTs in a tank. Sometimes, you just have to consider the advice and try it out yourself. I am glad to hear about the success with your method and I am glad people try these different things. Plants can adapt to a range of conditions as long as it is within their zone of tolerance. Sometimes it is nice to push the conventions and try out alternative methods to further expand those conventions.
 

Satanas

dynastes67
Joined
Apr 27, 2015
Messages
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Grown as intermediate>highland
<a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/132211299@N05/21177605473/in/dateposted/" title="DSC01123"><img src="https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5769/21177605473_a467426d08_z.jpg" width="640" height="480" alt="DSC01123"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
temps don't really matter in my case
 
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thez_yo

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Virginia, USA
I think that for most of these carnivorous plants the real mitigating factor is probably sunlight. I have tried experimenting with growing various genus' either in terrariums (with and without lights), on windowsills, outside and in greenhouses. Here in SE Alaska, lower night time temperatures are never an issue, humidity is never an issue BUT available light IS an issue. A D. capensis or N. ventricosa can survive on a naturally lit windowsill here and survive, but it will barely grow and only pitcher or look somewhat healthy in the summer. With a little artificial lighting it seems that MOST carnivorous plants will grow just fine anywhere you put them. (within reason).

As a terrarium grower I have constantly heard people say, "no you can't grow that plant in a terrarium for any extended amount of time as it will quickly out grow your enclosure." I have found that for the majority of Nepenthes species (especially), that this is just not true. The plants can stay quite small and quite manageable for several years. Though, if you wish to see them flower they will need to move on eventually, but for most people, a couple of years isn't really a short amount of time. Very vigorous Nepenthes hybrids WILL usually outgrow terrariums within a year or several months though, that is true.

On the other end of the spectrum - it blows my mind that there are people that can't keep plants alive at all, considering how forgiving most plant species really are. :banana2:

Yeah, all these years later (4?), my N.hamiguitanensis is hitting the top of my 1' cube terrarium at work, and I have to figure out what to do with it. It really hates life in low humidity... Im not sure what to do yet. Space restrictions mean I can't get a bigger terra, and it will just sulk and sulk at home on the window. Maybe I need to keep it bagged forever.
 

Satanas

dynastes67
Joined
Apr 27, 2015
Messages
124
Can you let us know your growing conditions?
Simple glass terrarium; open glass top

Day: 2 full spectrum LED, 1 UFO grow spectrum LED
Night: Humidifier, 2 quiet computer fans.

That simple, I mist every few days and coffee treat every month and a half or so.
 

Dexenthes

Aristoloingulamata
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Southern Tongass Rainforest, Alaska
Yeah, all these years later (4?), my N.hamiguitanensis is hitting the top of my 1' cube terrarium at work, and I have to figure out what to do with it. It really hates life in low humidity... Im not sure what to do yet. Space restrictions mean I can't get a bigger terra, and it will just sulk and sulk at home on the window. Maybe I need to keep it bagged forever.

haha See? 4 years! WHERE'S YOUR HIGHLAND GREENHOUSE ZU?

Why can't you have it in a small terrarium at home? I don't know if it could help at all, but perhaps just a large cup or tupperware container that you could put over the plant during the night only could help it enough to form leaves and such?

- - - Updated - - -

Simple glass terrarium; open glass top

Day: 2 full spectrum LED, 1 UFO grow spectrum LED
Night: Humidifier, 2 quiet computer fans.

That simple, I mist every few days and coffee treat every month and a half or so.

Not to be controversial, but to me, that honestly sounds close to ideal for Nepenthes. :lol:
 

Satanas

dynastes67
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Apr 27, 2015
Messages
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I don't use any artificial cooling except for computer fans, which just circulate the cool mist

..and if that is still considered ideal, then I feel much relieved.
 
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thez_yo

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Dex, it'll just be an eyesore in a ziplock bag on the window. But the key point is that it'll be *my* little eyesore :p
 
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Dex, it'll just be an eyesore in a ziplock bag on the window. But the key point is that it'll be *my* little eyesore :p

Great name for a hybrid. N. x mylittleyesore; rolls off the tongue better than N. robcantleyiiiiiiiiiiiiii . . .
 

Bio

Plant Whisperer
Joined
Mar 20, 2014
Messages
514
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SC
I don't use any artificial cooling except for computer fans, which just circulate the cool mist

..and if that is still considered ideal, then I feel much relieved.

If you don't mind me asking, where do you live? Location can play a big role in determining how important nighttime cooling is. For example, here in SC I have no chance of growing highlanders without an AC unit, but on the west coast they can be grown outdoors year round.
 

thez_yo

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Great name for a hybrid. N. x mylittleyesore; rolls off the tongue better than N. robcantleyiiiiiiiiiiiiii . . .

Nomenclature tiffs aside, could you please nicely give us an explanation of your various growing environments? I know you've got a couple.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Location
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Nomenclature tiffs aside, could you please nicely give us an explanation of your various growing environments? I know you've got a couple.

I am currently growing in two places, with plans on consolidating them later this year. In SF, I have a number of plants either outdoors or in a cold frame, which has recently seen some damn cold nighttime temperatures of late, as well as under lights in TC; and, near the Monterey Bay area, where some seedlings remain outside in germination domes. Some plants are simply enjoying a south-facing window; and others are currently under 6400K compact fluorescent lights in a garage, transitioning from being removed -- ex vitro -- from aseptic germination or tissue culture. Everything is kept at seasonal ambient temperatures . . .
 

vraev

Carnivorous plant enthusiast
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Ontario, Canada
Grown as intermediate>highland

<script async="" src="https://widgets.flickr.com/embedr/embedr-2961c25d22839adb2dec85c401c58c24.js"></script><script async="" src="https://embedr.flickr.com/assets/embedr-loader.js"></script><script async="" src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
Beautiful plant. Btw..sorry of OT...but how do u embed that with the flickr overlay and stuff. Which embed codes do u use in the share menu for your flickr pic? :)
temps don't really matter in my case
 

Heli

villosaholic
Joined
Aug 8, 2011
Messages
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Brooklyn
vraev, I believe it is HTML embed. So for example here is the code with a few tags removed so you can see what it looks like.

a
data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/99611974@N05/22799154697/in/dateposted-public/" title="Untitled">

img src="https://farm1.staticflickr.com/681/22799154697_9525db355a_c.jpg" width="600" height="800" alt="Untitled">

/a script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script



This is how it looks when the code is put in place with all tags
<a data-flickr-embed="true" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/99611974@N05/22799154697/in/dateposted-public/" title="Untitled"><img src="https://farm1.staticflickr.com/681/22799154697_9525db355a_c.jpg" width="600" height="800" alt="Untitled"></a><script async src="//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js" charset="utf-8"></script>
 
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