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I have had this N. ventricosa (arist x thorelli) for a long time now, about 7-8 months. I originally got it from Paul as a generous gift, and when I first got it, it was green like its sibling. However during acclimation it soon turned cherry red, and I thought it was just horrible sunburn, as was confirmed by Paul who noted I had cooked it. Well now 7-8 months later it is still cherry red, all new growth is cherry red, and its pitchers are also cherry red! I wanted to know if anyone here really had an explanation for this thing. I know when plants get ample amounts of light theyll make kind of dark maroon leaves and such, but honestly Im just growing this on a windowsill that does not get too much light as far as I know. (At least not recently, Ive noted in the summer and spring months the sun doesnt peak out in front of the window like it did in winter and fall.) I also have never seen a plant THIS red. Theyre usually more of a purpleish maroon, not this kind of bright red.

Thanks for any answer!

GWmnu8z.jpg


Its seed sibling for comparison, both are the same age:

YRDxckc.jpg
 
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Heavy anthocyanin pigmentation.

But why? What is the cause? As I said before my window doesnt get enough light to cause anything else to make red leaves but this guy. Ive moved its position around in my growtent to less sunny spots for very long periods of times (several months) and it never changed its pigment.
 
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The best thing about genes is that they don't get evenly distributed amongst offspring, thereby compounding diversity. The uneven distribution of genes and the traits expressed by them is most evident in hybrids such as this. This plant just happens to have gotten a heavier dose of anthocyanin than it's brother or sister.
 
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The weird thing to me is simply that it was never red until it acclimated here, is it possible the shock somehow triggered that gene or something?
 
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No. As plants grow, more and more of their attributes will come to light. Stop over thinking this and enjoy your plant for what it is.
 

DragonsEye

carnivorous plants of the world -- unite!
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Beautiful look. (Think I would have gone with a more "sinister" name like "Blood Moon". :D )
 
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How big should these get?
Beautiful either way!

Well, I imagine theyll get as big as any other Nepenthes would.. Im not sure if anyone has a mature cross yet, Paul gave a lot of these to a lot of people from what I understand. I've seen pictures of much larger plants than mine.
 
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Well, I imagine theyll get as big as any other Nepenthes would.. Im not sure if anyone has a mature cross yet, Paul gave a lot of these to a lot of people from what I understand. I've seen pictures of much larger plants than mine.

LOL Neps grow to different sizes. Different pitcher sizes, different leaf sizes. I wasn't referring to vining. :p
 
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Phosphorus deficiency. Causes anthocyanin buildup and negatively impacts root growth. It results from the low pH of Sphag locking up available P in the soil. It's further induced when the plant wants to grow vigorously, such as after exposure to good conditions (high light/humidity/etc) or root disturbance (transplanting/repotting).

Introducing food through the roots just results in it being locked up, so foliar feeding a high-P fertilizer will green your plant up.
 
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tje25

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Phosphorus deficiency. Causes anthocyanin buildup and negatively impacts root growth. It results from the low pH of Sphag locking up available P in the soil. It's further induced when the plant wants to grow vigorously, such as after exposure to good conditions (high light/humidity/etc) or root disturbance (transplanting/repotting).

Introducing food through the roots just results in it being locked up, so foliar feeding a high-P fertilizer will green your plant up.

Very interesting! I have a young plant that did the exact same thing. It was green when I got it but is now the same red as the ops is.

Mine is a N. (ventricosa x spectabilis) x tenius
https://farm1.staticflickr.com/315/17822983433_ca179841d6_b.jpg
 
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Oh wow very interesting theplantman. Thank you for the response :) Would there be any serious negative effects if I just didnt do anything about it? Honestly I like the red ;P
 
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Oh wow very interesting theplantman. Thank you for the response :) Would there be any serious negative effects if I just didnt do anything about it? Honestly I like the red ;P

Blooming (not a concern because of the plant's age), root growth, and vigor get impacted by low P. However, CPs are adapted to tolerate this type of deficiency much more than any other plants. So I'd say if you like it, leave it.
 
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I should point out, however, that just by applying a bit more Phosphorus it doesn't mean the plant is going to lose ALL its red and become blandly green-only. Genetics will ensure that its always going to be far redder than its siblings.
 
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I should point out, however, that just by applying a bit more Phosphorus it doesn't mean the plant is going to lose ALL its red and become blandly green-only. Genetics will ensure that its always going to be far redder than its siblings.

This is true. By no means was I suggesting P will turn all plants into a disgusting neon green color. I have siblings from this same cross, and even with P supplementation several still have a substantially purplish hue (again, also attractive IMO). It's my suspicion that at least in some cases, genetics play a role in the various pathways for P uptake/use.

And another caveat to all I've said thus far is that P isn't quite as leaf-mobile as other nutrients (iron, Ca, K, etc.) and it takes a number of foliar applications before you actually begin to cause a shift from bright purple to green. The change isn't instantaneous. Each application essentially shifts the plant slightly along the spectrum from deficient to sufficient.
 
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This is true. By no means was I suggesting P will turn all plants into a disgusting neon green color. I have siblings from this same cross, and even with P supplementation several still have a substantially purplish hue (again, also attractive IMO). It's my suspicion that at least in some cases, genetics play a role in the various pathways for P uptake/use.

And another caveat to all I've said thus far is that P isn't quite as leaf-mobile as other nutrients (iron, Ca, K, etc.) and it takes a number of foliar applications before you actually begin to cause a shift from bright purple to green. The change isn't instantaneous. Each application essentially shifts the plant slightly along the spectrum from deficient to sufficient.

Excellent information, Kevin. Well said, thanks!
 
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