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Mystery Pot of Dews

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Purchased this mystery pot of sundews from a nursery that was unfamiliar with them, keeping them in shaded corners and advising me to avoid direct sunlight. I know the majority of the pot is either D. Filiformis or D. Tracyi (How do you tell the difference? Or is it possible at their size?) but there's two other sundews that I'm unfamiliar with. As for the D. Filiformis, since they're currently in dormancy (I assume from the hibernacula) would now be a bad time to move everyone into their own pot? I'm hoping they'll color up nicely once I move them into 8+ hours of sun.

Thanks,
Justin






 
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D. tracyi has no red in the glands It's a green plant

Awesome thanks for the info, now I've read there's two species of D. Filiformis. The Florida Giant and The Florida All Red... any ideas?
 
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These look like typical D.filiformis var. filiformis. I also see D.intermedia and what appears to be D.capillaris in there.
 

bluemax

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When you speak about divisions in the D. filiformis group there is some disagreement but the two Florida plants you mention are considered forms of the species D. filiformis. I believe I see a Drosera rotundifolia in that last photo as well. That is quite a nice collection in one purchase.
 
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When you speak about divisions in the D. filiformis group there is some disagreement but the two Florida plants you mention are considered forms of the species D. filiformis.
So they're like a 'sub' species of them?

I believe I see a Drosera rotundifolia in that last photo as well.
I would have guessed it was a D.intermedia as well.

That is quite a nice collection in one purchase.
Thanks! I recall only being able to find D. Filiformis for about $10 a plant and I have about six for $15... It's the only nursery that sells CP in my area of SF I could find. They told me they usually carry Pings and a wider selection of Dews but apparently they sell well. Here are some of their Sarras and Neps labeled as 'Alata', I couldn't pass on the Neps, for the price it was a huge plant. But after some research I've come to the conclusion that it's not a true Alata and some form of Alata hybrid.



 
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But after some research I've come to the conclusion that it's not a true Alata and some form of Alata hybrid.

It's probably the commonly TC'ed garden center clone(s?) of N. x "ventrata", although whether or not it's truly the hybrid N. ventricosa x alata or something like ventricosa x graciliflora is still up for debate...I rather doubt it though.
 
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Thats. N. Ventrata, a common plant bandied about as alata.
Thanks for the help. Standard care for this guy? Water every three days or so and mist it to keep pitcher production going?

It's probably the commonly TC'ed garden center clone(s?) of N. x "ventrata", although whether or not it's truly the hybrid N. ventricosa x alata or something like ventricosa x graciliflora is still up for debate...I rather doubt it though.
They said the supplier for their CPs is just some guy off the street who has a large collection.
 

bluemax

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So they're like a 'sub' species of them?
That's the general idea. A subspecies is a more formal call and considered to be more definitely defined. It gets kind of messy below the species level, and sometimes above it. Calling something that looks decidedly different than the norm a 'form' is usually safe, though.


I would have guessed it was a D.intermedia as well.

Drosera intermedia has leaf lamina (the traps) that are longer than wide ordinarily. D. rotundifolia has lamina that are wider than long or more round usually. Also they are more ground-hugging. This is how it looks to me on your photo.

You have certainly gotten a good response to your questions. If you haven't been around TF for awhile you might be surprised at just how knowledgeable some of these growers are! (Myself excluded.)
 
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Going by the 1st photo in the post I see 2 D.intermedia, one at 2:00 and one at 5:00. I also see what appears to be D.capillaris at 6:00. I'm not seeing anything that resembles D.rotundifolia in that pot.
 
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The smaller rosetted plants are D. intermedia and tokaiensis (which appears to be widely mistaken for capillaris as much as it is spatulata). The thin-leaved plants are definitely D. filiformis, probably the nominate form (classification goes subspecies, variety, and form, corresponding usually from geographically to distinct color morphs to what one could call line-breeds, the latter two often not recognized by some taxonomists). D. tracyi does have red pigment in the tentacles, but only in the heads and relatively faint, while the entire tentacle and often the leaves in filiformis have color. tracyi also has shorter, denser tentacles.

The nep is definitely ventrata, and the Sarracenia if they don't have labels shouldn't be given one, but the first looks somewhat like that plant they call "Carolina Yellow Jacket" but with more veins...
 

ErrorEN

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The nep is definitely ventrata, and the Sarracenia if they don't have labels shouldn't be given one, but the first looks somewhat like that plant they call "Carolina Yellow Jacket" but with more veins...

Spot on. The unidentified Sarrs are very likely to be 'Judith Hindle' and 'Bugbat', which are common TC-produced plants.
 
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I thought the taller one looked a little too thin to be Judith. Was my first inclination but it looks a little off, though that might just be because the leaves are half dead....Bug Bat looks right though.
 

bluemax

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Going by the 1st photo in the post I see 2 D.intermedia, one at 2:00 and one at 5:00. I also see what appears to be D.capillaris at 6:00. I'm not seeing anything that resembles D.rotundifolia in that pot.

I agree that my 'rotundifolia' is actually intermedia. 'Guess that will teach me to look at the full-resolution shot before making a call. I do think the 6:00 plant has overly thick petioles to likely be D. capillaris.
 
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Thanks for everyone's help on these guys! They're already turning around after a few days in the sun.
 
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