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Joined
Jan 2, 2004
Messages
240
Location
N. Virginia, USA
Although spring is my favorite time of the year, I do like the fall pitchers of many of my Sarracenia. My leucophylla and alabamensis clones are at their peak right now (although their gluttony is rapidly spoiling their good looks) and I'm seeing a new flush of growth in a number of hybrids.

Snapped iPhone pics of two of my favorite hybrids recently and wanted to share:

S. leucophylla x S. rubra gulfensis

This naturally-occurring hybrid has likely introgressed with rubra, as it doesn't have the bolder red-and-white coloration of first-generation hybrids of these species. I like its subtlety, however, and its rich "harvest gold" color. Looks much better in a plant than in a kitchen appliance (ok, I'm dating myself).



S. minor x S. leucophylla

This is one of my Holy Grail plants. It was given to me as a naturally-occurring hybrid found on a roadside decades ago in Franklin Co., FL. Here, the ranges of the two species just barely touch (western edge of S. minor and eastern edge of S. leucophylla territories), so this plant -- if true -- is almost indescribably rare. It doesn't have the tall elegance of the horticultural S. x excellens hybrids I've seen (and have, thanks to Stephen Davis and Phil Falusi), as those are typically crossed with Okefenokee giant minors. Additionally, the leucophylla clones in this area are short, stout and very red/pink (the Tate's Hell pink tube leucophylla clones come from this area).

 
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Joined
Jul 11, 2013
Messages
183
That S. minor x S. leucophylla is probably the most beautiful Sarracenia I have ever seen. Awesome plant!
 

CorneliusSchrute

A leuco by any other name would still be as glutto
Joined
May 5, 2013
Messages
534
Location
Dexter, MO
Harvest Gold. Though before my time (cough) in regards to appliances, I appreciate it greatly with your plant above.

Thanks for sharing, Jay!
 
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