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Some help needed for a few problems.

Joined
Sep 22, 2015
Messages
5
Hi everyone,

I am kinda new here and also about a month in keeping neps. I have 3 problems here.

Country: Malaysia
Day: 31 celcius Night: 24 celcius
Water: Tap water (cant afford a tds reader, yet)
Soil: coco peat with perlite.
No mister/fogger but I mist whenever I am outside so maybe twice a day.

Specifications above especially for water and soil is advice from the local nep nursery.

N.bicalcarata has some rusty spots on 2 of its oldest leaves which seem to be slowly spreading.
SEnasEn.jpg


N.miranda with curling leaves.
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N.ventrata and N.bicalcarata. White spots started on the ventrata and have been spreading all over the plant including my bical.
K4aJTm0.jpg
 
Joined
Sep 22, 2015
Messages
5
Just in case anyone is following this, the curling and white spots has been solved. The cause was thrips and I did a full insecticide and fungicide spray. Still feel it is kinda weird that thrips has such an effect on neps since I am used to them infesting my other 'normal' plants and it does not look like that. I also repotted the plants just to be safe in case it was mineral buildup.
 

Dave S.

NECPS President
Joined
Jun 23, 2003
Messages
589
Location
Northern MA
I have a N. bicalcarata that has the "rust" on the leaves which is most likely a common nepenthes fungal infection due to stress. If your new growth is not repeating this pattern, you should be OK. I would not mist the leaves with water. I would guess that growing this plant outside in Malaysia is a humid enough environment without the need to mist in my view.

The curling leaves on the N. miranda could be a sign of root stress; which could be from thrips or something similar.

I am glad you solved the pest problem.
 
Joined
Sep 22, 2015
Messages
5
I have a N. bicalcarata that has the "rust" on the leaves which is most likely a common nepenthes fungal infection due to stress. If your new growth is not repeating this pattern, you should be OK. I would not mist the leaves with water. I would guess that growing this plant outside in Malaysia is a humid enough environment without the need to mist in my view.

The curling leaves on the N. miranda could be a sign of root stress; which could be from thrips or something similar.

I am glad you solved the pest problem.

Thank you so much for the advise. The rust is on the 2 oldest leaves and not spreading so I am just keeping an eye on it. Hopefully everything goes well lol. Thanks again!
 
Joined
Jul 3, 2011
Messages
3,940
Dave used the term "Rust" in double quotes to indicate that - although this is a word commonly used to describe this particular fungal affliction - it is not a Rust fungus at all; it's Cercospora.
And yes, it generally affects only older foliage as it senesces, or plants that are stressed. If it's not affecting newer foliage, then it's not a problem. Photos of Nepenthes species in situ often show signs of this affliction on the foliage. It seems this genus has evolved to have a relationship with the pathogen. Many species grown in cultivation exhibit some signs of infection; it's normal. You just don't want plants to get so stressed that the fungus runs amok in the plant.
 
Joined
Sep 22, 2015
Messages
5
Dave used the term "Rust" in double quotes to indicate that - although this is a word commonly used to describe this particular fungal affliction - it is not a Rust fungus at all; it's Cercospora.
And yes, it generally affects only older foliage as it senesces, or plants that are stressed. If it's not affecting newer foliage, then it's not a problem. Photos of Nepenthes species in situ often show signs of this affliction on the foliage. It seems this genus has evolved to have a relationship with the pathogen. Many species grown in cultivation exhibit some signs of infection; it's normal. You just don't want plants to get so stressed that the fungus runs amok in the plant.

Understood! Thanks for the explanation!
 
Joined
Nov 9, 2010
Messages
973
Location
Athens, GA
Dave used the term "Rust" in double quotes to indicate that - although this is a word commonly used to describe this particular fungal affliction - it is not a Rust fungus at all; it's Cercospora.
And yes, it generally affects only older foliage as it senesces, or plants that are stressed. If it's not affecting newer foliage, then it's not a problem. Photos of Nepenthes species in situ often show signs of this affliction on the foliage. It seems this genus has evolved to have a relationship with the pathogen. Many species grown in cultivation exhibit some signs of infection; it's normal. You just don't want plants to get so stressed that the fungus runs amok in the plant.

+1. And also, a high-K and low-N liquid feed will promote the plant's immune system fighting off Cercospora. Bical is a heavy feeder, particularly of K.
 
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