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nepenthes species wanted+ advice needed

thez_yo

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so do you have any recommendations for vendors who are quite cheap, have the rare and less rare stuff and won't require it?

That's like finding a unicorn :-))

Have you researched to see if there's a carnivorous plant enthusiast club somewhere in-country (and if you're lucky, local?). They'd probably give you the best advice because a lot of the members here are USA-based so we mainly know how to (or not to!) import/export/ship plants around country and which shops to buy things at.
 
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lol I'm not so surprised. but is there anybody here willing to try international shipping? or anybody who knows someone like this? if I get an ok from the guys here for growing burbidgeae here with humidifier and protection, and if sangrocks still has it for sale, I'll probably want to buy it because this species is amazing.
 
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lol I'm not so surprised. but is there anybody here willing to try international shipping? or anybody who knows someone like this? if I get an ok from the guys here for growing burbidgeae here with humidifier and protection, and if sangrocks still has it for sale, I'll probably want to buy it because this species is amazing.

You can buy from private sellers if you want but permits are non-negotiable for nepenthes. Whether you buy from nurseries or individuals nepenthes are on CITES. Without proper permits your plants can be seized or destroyed by customs if they happen to inspect your package. Whatever you do, you will need to get the requisite documents to import.
 
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thanks, but I prefer or someone known and reliable or someone who will add the cost of phyto, import permit and shipping costs so I'll see that he's reliable

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but I thought wistuba and such do provide every needed documents and such to import the plants

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it's written there that the plants are imported from the uk
 
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Yeah, because Wistuba works with a network of distributors that have their own import certifications. No such system exists for any other nepenthes nursery. Both the buyer and seller need paperwork for international movement of nepenthes.
 
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so if I pre-order something from wistuba's, I won't need to provide any certificates? and if I just push add to cart, I'll get the plant without a need to purchase it again?
 

thez_yo

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so if I pre-order something from wistuba's, I won't need to provide any certificates? and if I just push add to cart, I'll get the plant without a need to purchase it again?

These are all excellent questions to contact him and ask him yourself because afaik nobody else here is in Israel so they won't know the specifics of importing to your country. It might be worth it if you're eyeing anything Malesiana Tropicals or Borneo Exotics or any of the other bigger nurseries if they've ever imported to Israel either and you might get a better idea of what the paperwork entails. If you're buying from someplace like MT or BE though afaik they have a minimum order amount so if you reach out to them, be prepared to have somewhat of a big shopping list.
 
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I think a bigger problem is that your winter nights won't make lowlanders happy and rest of the year won't make intermediate/highlanders happy. My gut feel is that it is going to be harder to get lowlanders to survive very cold winters than it will be to get intermediates/highlanders to survive summers with an assist. That said, you could try both. People who live in colder places could explain what they do to keep their lowlanders alive through winter.

As someone who grows in very lowland conditions and manages to keep several intermediates and highlanders alive, I can confirm that at least in my conditions, a misting system does produce dramatic results. The key is to use it to create more of an ambient humidity than watering of plants or even wetting of leaves. In peak summer, my misting can be set for 5 seconds every 5 minutes. Use as high pressure a system as you can afford, run it on a timer. The higher the pressure, the "drier" the mist - meaning, very small droplets are produced, which flash evaporate from the friction of being forced into the air. This works to create a temperature drop even in high humidity.

Aim to cool and humidify the AREA they are growing in, not the plant.

I am not going to pretend that all is rosy. Peak summers can be brutal. Many highlanders will not pitcher and will simply hang in there with somewhat slowed growth - my night temps in summer are consistently above 27C for several months. You may lose some plants. but overall, combined with watering with cool water... it is possible. One tip - automate everything needed to create stable conditions. The more stable the conditions you can give them - even if ****** and 15 degrees hotter than their preferred nights - the more the plants will adapt.

You should also research about species. Many intermediate/highland neps tolerate high temps better than others. Highland truncatas/veitchii, burbidgeae, anything from the maxima family.... too early to say but possibly lowii too. Another good hack is highland x lowland hybrids.

In my conditions, good ventilaion is MUST. I keep any use of plastic to retain humidity to an absolute minimum. Leverage evaporative cooling to the HILT. Big earthen pots or sphagnum in net pots, keep plants close to each other, water generously so that the whole area is soaked and dries off taking heat away. But don't use ice/very cold water.

One useful trick is to buy them just after the summer is over, so that they have time to establish and grow robustly before the next summer heat challenges them. Plants that are not well established are more likely to die.
 
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the problem of mine is that some of the things which are required to take care of highlanders and even intermediates, are not cheap at all and may be over what I can afford. as mentioned before, the winters here are not really brutal. it would never get to 5 celsius I think, maybe only in specific periods of times at night. I don't want to buy species which require strict conditions, because the plants I want, as I noticed, usually cost above 50 dollars, which is quite a lot if I want to start with more than one to try. if these species were cheaper, even in 10 dollars, it would be easier. but since I can't afford a loss of more than 150 dollars per plant at most, I don't really want to start experimenting with more than one plant. and the cost is not only the plant- I'm pretty sure that the rest which is needed to provide the appropriate climate will cost 100+ dollars, which I really have to take into count. regarding everything mentioned above, I prefer a plant which people here really think or even know that can grow easier in such a climate, so I won't lose too much money trying to provide growing conditions which I simply can't afford. out of those you mentioned, I really like lowii and burbidgeae. do you think, providing humidity (humidifier) and colder growing conditions (cold water) will be enough to keep these alive?
 
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and what is considered stable conditions? there definitely is a change of conditions between the different seasons. I think the most I'd pay for both the plant and the system which provides the right conditions is 200. I do prefer pure species or natural hybrids and not man made hybrids.
 
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the problem of mine is that some of the things which are required to take care of highlanders and even intermediates, are not cheap at all and may be over what I can afford. as mentioned before, the winters here are not really brutal. it would never get to 5 celsius I think, maybe only in specific periods of times at night.
Anything under 18-20C gets lowlanders moody. The BRIEF excuse for winter I get sees my bicals pause for a bit. And the worst possible here is around 16C excluding some extreme event. More usually 18-20C.
I don't want to buy species which require strict conditions, because the plants I want, as I noticed, usually cost above 50 dollars, which is quite a lot if I want to start with more than one to try. if these species were cheaper, even in 10 dollars, it would be easier. but since I can't afford a loss of more than 150 dollars per plant at most, I don't really want to start experimenting with more than one plant. and the cost is not only the plant- I'm pretty sure that the rest which is needed to provide the appropriate climate will cost 100+ dollars, which I really have to take into count. regarding everything mentioned above, I prefer a plant which people here really think or even know that can grow easier in such a climate, so I won't lose too much money trying to provide growing conditions which I simply can't afford. out of those you mentioned, I really like lowii and burbidgeae. do you think, providing humidity (humidifier) and colder growing conditions (cold water) will be enough to keep these alive?
Maxima family sounds like a good start. They make attractive pitchers and grow in pretty much any climate, I think. One odd one to try could be khasiana. As far as I know, khasianas are also pretty happy to grow in any conditions you throw at them.
and what is considered stable conditions? there definitely is a change of conditions between the different seasons. I think the most I'd pay for both the plant and the system which provides the right conditions is 200. I do prefer pure species or natural hybrids and not man made hybrids.
Stable conditions... the best you can give them, consistently. If you are misting, then it has to happen around the clock, not spray a few times, forget a few times. If you are giving them direct sun, bright shade, artificial lighting, then that should be consistent daily and for similar (or gradually changing due to seasons) durations every day. Not to let them get too soggy or dry out. If you are giving them say 60-70% humidity, then not suddenly changing it to 20%. And so on. The conditions they get, should be similar. Day after day, so that the plants can get used to those conditions and adapt accordingly.

Hope that made sense.
 
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it indeed makes sense. humidity will possibly drop to 30% and lower when the temp is 39+ celsius and less than 50% in 33+ celsius (without humidifier). my conditions are half shade, north east facing balcony. light is not very strong, so I think species growing deep in forests are preferred. is there a possibility in a misting system to mist automatically every specific period of time?
 
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it indeed makes sense. humidity will possibly drop to 30% and lower when the temp is 39+ celsius and less than 50% in 33+ celsius (without humidifier). my conditions are half shade, north east facing balcony. light is not very strong, so I think species growing deep in forests are preferred. is there a possibility in a misting system to mist automatically every specific period of time?

There are very few nepenthes that grow in deep forest, and those that do are niche species that aren't suitable to your conditions for other reasons. Generally, more light is better.
 
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so again, I stick to my question. if anybody is living in a country with hotter/ similar conditions (mentioned before,can be called Mediterranean or subtropical I guess) and grows some plants of the list in half shade, which ones can grow successfully here? thanks.

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so I understand that burbidgeae and lowii should be able to grow here woth cool water watering and a misting system. am I right?
 
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No, I absolutely would not grow lowii in your conditions, even with misters running. Your summers would still be likely to kill it. As for burbidgeae you might be able to. But consider acclimatization time. It took mine almost a year to settle and begin producing pitchers consistently in conditions more favorable than yours. Do you want to be staring at a pitcherless plant for that long if it'll be one of your only nepenthes?
 
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well, growing hylocereus undatus for 5 years and only seeing green sticks growing until it bloomed a year ago, so yeah, I have patience:)
I'll probably buy another, cheap plant so it won't be that boring... but, which of the species of the list would you recommend too?
 
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will probably be the best friend of mine in corona times;)

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any recommended misting system which costs up to 100 dollars? (up to 50 preferred) with cyclic timer
 
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