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Aroids

DragonsEye

carnivorous plants of the world -- unite!
Joined
Nov 17, 2011
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1,667
Location
Michigan
So is the "fragrance" everything you dreamed it would be? heh
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
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4,696
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Sauromatum really is not that powerful (at least not this one). I can keep it in my bedroom while in bloom and it still doesn't even compete with one of my snakes having a crap fest.
The Amorphophallus konjac that bloomed last year on the other hand...I left it out on the deck in the back yard and still got complaints from the family. I can only imagine what will happen if/when the other species I have like henryi, bulbifer, paeoniifolius etc. start blooming, as they're usually far more potent.
 

thez_yo

instigator
Joined
Sep 12, 2009
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5,529
Location
Virginia, USA
LMAO

When the Nep girls bloom they STANK so I toss them outside when I can. Easy in San Diego most of the year, but here growing them inside now it's an eyewatering stench for which I almost grabbed the mask a few times :-)) At least the Sarras want to be outside here so them and their pee smell can hang out by the shed!
 
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Nepenthes are in the greenhouse here, only I deal with that smell (though I only ever seem to have a couple plants in bloom at a time...), but it's never been particularly bad to me. Sarracenia, they bloom while still downstairs here because yay, right now is usually approaching the end of frost season...but the smell is usually concentrated in mid-mornings when people are usually not here, and definitely not downstairs.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,696
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
So many things waking up...
A. albus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
A. albus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
A. nepalensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
A. nepalensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
A. konjac 'Nightstick' by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
A. myosuroides by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
One of soon to be four seed-grown
A. mossambicensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Sauromatum venosum by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
A. impressus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
A. impressus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
A. henryi by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
A. henryi by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
A. symonianus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
A. fuscus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
A. fuscus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
 
Joined
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Messages
4,696
Location
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More fantastic weirdos coming up:
Amorphophallus excentricus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus excentricus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus krausei by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus krausei by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus yuloensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus yuloensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus natolii by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus natolii by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
This is definitely one of the gems of the collection right now though
Amorphophallus decus-silvae Clone A by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
And this petiole is why:
Amorphophallus decus-silvae Clone A by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus decus-silvae Clone A by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Full corner
Amorphophallus corner by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
One of the things that grows outside (and smells like nail polish remover)
Pinellia pedatisecta by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Pinellia pedatisecta by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Pinellia pedatisecta by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Also this rare gem amuses me; this photo shows it as twice the size of the last pic I posted, but it's now already about twice this diameter. Didn't think the second leaf will get so huge, makes me look forward to next year when it should start showing more mature traits
Pseudohydrosme gabunensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Also I don't feel like starting a new thread just for these, so...
Lupinus bicolor by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Lupinus bicolor by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
My favorite pepper in the world (unless my cross with 'Medusa' works as I hope, then maybe that will be)
'Black Pearl' pepper by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
'Black Pearl' pepper by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Red poppies by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Datura stramonium by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Datura stramonium by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
 

DragonsEye

carnivorous plants of the world -- unite!
Joined
Nov 17, 2011
Messages
1,667
Location
Michigan

That is indeed a VERY nice petiole on the Amorphophallus decus-silvae Clone A.

My A. konjacs still haven' awakened. Don't know what their deal is. If they don't do something soon they won't survive the winter. (Should they decide to sprout in the fall, they won't have the energy to survive dormancy and I'm not about to try growing them over the winter.... Don't have the space or the lighting.)
 
Joined
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Location
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That is indeed a VERY nice petiole on the Amorphophallus decus-silvae Clone A.

My A. konjacs still haven' awakened. Don't know what their deal is. If they don't do something soon they won't survive the winter. (Should they decide to sprout in the fall, they won't have the energy to survive dormancy and I'm not about to try growing them over the winter.... Don't have the space or the lighting.)

I've heard of plants remaining dormant through a whole season (had a haematospadix that's finally waking up now that did so last year), I wouldn't worry too much yet. My konjacs are only just unfurling outdoors right now (probably because I put them all outside this year and shocked them). And they'll take fairly low light if necessary.
 
Joined
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Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Amorphophallus konjac by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus konjac by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus konjac by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Something's been stinking up the living room recently...
Typhonium albidinervum by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus terrestris by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus lambii by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus lambii by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus nanus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus nanus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus muelleri by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
First of three, and a relatively new species to cultivation (I won the seeds with a perfect guess on the contest too)
Amorphophallus perrieri by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus perrieri by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
And a couple non-aroid things...
Red clover by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Collinsia grandiflora by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Collinsia grandiflora by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
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4,696
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Amorphophallus bulbifer by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus longituberosus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Another of the giants joins the group
Amorphophallus borneensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus borneensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
And one of the others is making some really interesting petioles
Amorphophallus decus-silvae by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus decus-silvae by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus decus-silvae by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus decus-silvae by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus decus-silvae by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus decus-silvae by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
And, no idea what this actually is since the company I got it from certainly didn't send the right species, but I'm getting the sense it may be a big one
Amorphophallus "not paeoniifolius" by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus "not paeoniifolius" by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,696
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Not an aroid, but still don't quite feel like making a second thread...didn't want to kill this just yet so I've brought it inside
'Black Pearl' by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
And I've got some weird South African bulbs waking up
Brunsvigia marginata by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Brunsvigia bosmaniae by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
I need to find out if this is edible like the other species or not...
Hibiscus trionum by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Now onto aroids: a cool-growing species has woken up, sadly the second (also seed-grown, so unique) plant decided to rot instead of joining its sibling
Amorphophallus kiusianus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus kiusianus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
And the 4th-ranking giants are starting to gain some size
Amorphophallus borneensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus borneensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
And I reacquired this potential giant again after losing my other one last year...weird spiky petiole (hard to see in this terrible photo) and some of the oddest looking flowers in the group
Amorphophallus paeoniifolius by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Amorphophallus paeoniifolius by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
 
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