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Serracenia DO NOT need dormancy, sort of ...........

Joined
Apr 4, 2017
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14
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Miami FL
Hello to all,

Even though the title might bring a lot confusion I always wanted to bring this topic to discussion. The common knowledge is that serracenia and all North American pitcher plants require some type of dormancy to follow the natural rhythms of growth, flowering, seed, dormancy only to have the cycle repeat itself year after year. The process as far as everyone knows requires a gradual change in photo period and temperature. However I am a firm believer that some other factors take place that are not reasonably explained. Here is were I want to lead the discussion. I am no botanist and will like to invite anyone that knows more about these plants than me. Here is where my two cents count. I have always loved CPS and have a very nice collection in my home city of Miami. I grow some serracenias there also however every winter I have to go through the painstaking process of out rotting, cutting, and storing these plants in the refrigerator so these plants can survive. The photo period is correct however the temperature variation is not enough to make the plants thrive come south florida "spring". Everyone is probably asking, yes this very normal. so it is. Now lets jump to where I work.
I work for a construction company in Bogota Colombia. So why is this important you might ask? Colombia is very close to the equatorial line meaning that the photo period is relatively 50/50 (12H Daylight/12H Dark) Bogota is 2600M a.s.l or 8530 feet a.s.l an altitude that in some parts of the US will be perpetual snow year round. Bogota and most all of Colombia has a 6 month dry period and 6 month wet period this varies from year to year but it is more or less the norm. You might find that this is all very informative but what does it have to do with serracenia? Well I actually do not know how it relates, but I grow serracenia in Bogota. And they thrive. I have a 5 year old "Dana's Delight" with 30" tall pitchers or more a 4 year old "scarlette belle" and a 4 year old Purpurea can't remember exactly which one. The funniest thing is that I never have to uproot them. They flower at strange times of the year (usually following the wet/dry seasons) they are vigorous sending out new pitchers weekly and slowing down following the wet/dry seasons. One fact I forgot to add is that the hottest temperature of Bogota on a sunny day is about 78-80F and the lowest temperature is around 45-50F. These are year round temperatures. with 60 to 80 RH.
So I ask all. What the hell is going on?
Is it a question of year round temperature? the altitude? RH? a combination? something else? because the simple notion of the seasons and photo period gets thrown out the door.

A picture says a thousand words so I will attach some using tapatalk from my phone following this post.
 
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Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Messages
14
Location
Miami FL
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Last pic is a flower spike of "Danas Delight"
Pics are from today ;)


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Not a Number

Hello, I must be going...
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Perhaps some of our growers like [MENTION=4567]Cindy[/MENTION] in Singapore which is also near to the Equator will tell us their experiences in a warm/hot tropical climate.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
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Location
Greeley, CO, USA
*Sarracenia, and 'Scarlet Belle' (yes, spelling is important in horticulture just as it is taxonomy)
I remain skeptical about how well they will do in the very long term, and perhaps the tropical conditions could make them more susceptible to pests and diseases so perhaps good conditions are what's allowed them to last this long for several people, but being at elevation and in a region that does experience seasons of sorts it's possible the plants may be receiving "mini dormancies" in sort of the way highland Nepenthes slow down metabolism etc. at night, and the daily cycling may allow them to rest themselves an keep a steady growing pace year round. Also, though in an equatorial region the sun still swings from north to south and back throughout the year so seasonal shifts may still contribute in some manner and keep the plants on a clock.
 
Joined
Jan 23, 2016
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If they are flowering they might be going into dormancy. Flowering always seems to come after dormancy. In the time before flowering, do you notice slower or stopped growth? I'm in subtropical Florida, and that's what all my sarrs do.
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2017
Messages
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Location
Miami FL
Hello to all. To FLTropical. Yes they do experience some type of slow down before they flower.
To hcarlton thanks for the spelling correction Serracenia is the common name used in Spanish and to be honest it was an overlook. Also even though my plants are "young" the botanical gardens of Bogotá has of collection of various Kinds of Sarracenia since 1994 growing vigorously in one of the most visited displays. Plus also here in Bogota, in the wild, we have the opportunity to witness one of the most difficult carnivorous plants to keep in cultivation the P. Elongata. It is always funny to try to explain what is difficult to explain because the usual answer does not cut it. Or to debunk common knowledge of doing this or that. These are live beings trying to survive an adapting sometimes rapidly to do what they are programmed to do. To multiply. And to quote the corny movie JP "Nature finds a way"


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