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Seedling p lusitanica

Joined
Jun 4, 2005
Messages
228
Location
Southwestern Indiana
I have a number of seedlings of P. lusitanica that have sprouted, and they are begininng to crowd each other in the pot. The largest are about 1/2" across, smaller ones about 1/4". Are they big enough to separate out into individual pots, or should I bother? Will the crowding be harmful? I'm not sure how tolerant this species is to handling, especially when small. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.
 
Joined
May 4, 2003
Messages
3,077
Location
San Francisco, CA
I have p. lusitanica all over the place. Near as I can tell, they are the d. capensis of pinguicula. I have 'em growing in drosera pots, in utric pots, even in nep pots. Everything on the shelf below the p. lusitanica and everything near to it on it's shelf. I don't think one has ever died.

I say thin the herd! Thin it out before it's too late and we're all consumed!

Capslock
 

vft guy in SJ

VFT and Drosera lover
Joined
Jun 30, 2003
Messages
1,503
Location
Merced, California
[b said:
Quote[/b] (Capslock @ Sep. 19 2005,10:58)]I have p. lusitanica all over the place. Near as I can tell, they are the d. capensis of pinguicula.
I can attest to that.. after he had enough of them he spread them to me and its never stopped flowering/seeding since. I wouldnt worry about a few losses with this one.. you are sure to have plenty of replacements soon enough.

Cheers
Steve
 

jimscott

Tropical Fish Enthusiast
Joined
Nov 14, 2003
Messages
18,810
Location
Western New York
As a general rule of thumb, when I move a plant, I first prepare the new pot and create a depression in it to place the plant. I use a plastic spoon and try to move the plant and media, such that roots won't be disturbed. In other words, I try to move a plant without it being aware it has been moved. After placing it in the depression, I try to delicately move more media to provide contact. I then water it ro help with contact.

As Max and Steve have indicated, this species is very prolific and a few losses, as they can become a thick aggregation, isn't significant. On the other hand, moving a P. primuliflora isn't quite as easy as a transition, because of their root devlopment. Mexican pings don't have nearly as much root development and are very easy to transfer.
 
Joined
Jun 4, 2005
Messages
228
Location
Southwestern Indiana
Thanks all. I'll prepare a few pots and move some of them and see. Wasn't aware of how apparently hardy these little guys can be. Honestly I probably coddle all my plants too much (when I'm home).
 
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