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Pics of beautiful D. spatulata split flower scape

Joined
Jan 7, 2004
Messages
439
Location
Utah
Hey all, the D. spatulata deluxe I received from a nursery over Thanksgiving is flowering and has a beautiful split in the scape. I am currently getting a timelapse of its movement using the same lens I captured these images last night and I will share the YouTube link later tonight when the memory card is full and I got all I can out of it. :D

Enjoy the pics! Let me know what your favorite is so I share the right ones to my new instagram feed featuring my CPs that I am starting today. :D Thanks!

1st
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2nd
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3rd
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4th
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Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,680
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
What does the plant look like? I ask because the common sterile form of D. tokaiensis very regularly makes split flower stalks, and is still rampantly mislabeled even by big nurseries as spatulata.
 
Joined
Jan 7, 2004
Messages
439
Location
Utah
What does the plant look like? I ask because the common sterile form of D. tokaiensis very regularly makes split flower stalks, and is still rampantly mislabeled even by big nurseries as spatulata.

My unnamed source from one of our larger states in the Union simply called it a D. spatulata deluxe potted. So seeing how red it is. Seeing what you said about the split stalk, I wouldn't be surprised if it is D. tokaiensis! Hope it is! I have seedlings for D. spatulata growing right now so having another variety is awesome. :D

Dspatulata-3.jpg

Dspatulata-2.jpg

Dspatulata-1.jpg
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,680
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
That's definitely tokaiensis. If the flowers barely or rarely open, are dark pink, and don't produce any seeds, then you've confirmed you've got the sterile form ("D. tokaiensis var. hyugaensis," the hybrid predecessor of the polyploid fertile type form). I don't know if I would necessarily call this one exciting, as it's the second most common weed sundew there is (second only to the fertile form) and the most mislabeled plant out there; more tokaiensis are distributed as "spatulata," "capillaris," "brevifolia," and a couple dozen rarer species names than anything else. Similarly I'd be wary of those "spatulata" seeds unless they came from a highly reputable source with a location or form designation as they might turn out to be the fertile tokai. It's a bomb-proof and vigorous plant, but unfortunately painfully ubiquitous.
 
Joined
Jan 7, 2004
Messages
439
Location
Utah
That's definitely tokaiensis. If the flowers barely or rarely open, are dark pink, and don't produce any seeds, then you've confirmed you've got the sterile form ("D. tokaiensis var. hyugaensis," the hybrid predecessor of the polyploid fertile type form). I don't know if I would necessarily call this one exciting, as it's the second most common weed sundew there is (second only to the fertile form) and the most mislabeled plant out there; more tokaiensis are distributed as "spatulata," "capillaris," "brevifolia," and a couple dozen rarer species names than anything else. Similarly I'd be wary of those "spatulata" seeds unless they came from a highly reputable source with a location or form designation as they might turn out to be the fertile tokai. It's a bomb-proof and vigorous plant, but unfortunately painfully ubiquitous.

Haha definite truth to not being overly excited that I managed to gain an ubiquitous plant to my collection. Initially I thought, oh good, now I have more variety than I thought. Too bad it was pretty much inevitable to get this plant. :D

The spatulata seeds are NOT from a reputable source but some guy from the east coast who thought it might be D. tokaiensis or spatulata so I probably have nothing more than fertile tokaiensis seeds sprouting.

I am a member of the ICPS and have a spatulata form coming from them and over the next year I will get different varieties here and there. Too bad I might have dozens of tokaiensis on my hands that very few people will want to trade for.

But they are beautiful little plants nonetheless. :D

Thanks, HCarlton!
 

DragonsEye

carnivorous plants of the world -- unite!
Joined
Nov 17, 2011
Messages
1,667
Location
Michigan
Initially I thought, oh good, now I have more variety than I thought. Too bad it was pretty much inevitable to get this plant. :D

LOL Would you believe I've never been able to keep a tok or spat alive more than an month?

 
Joined
Jun 24, 2018
Messages
7
LOL Would you believe I've never been able to keep a tok or spat alive more than an month?

I kept my too alive for a year and it bloomed itself to death! Poor little guy!
ddabcb09bf643733b7e0f25bc2967be0.jpg

A pic of it at one time.

Sent from my SM-S727VL using Tapatalk
 

DragonsEye

carnivorous plants of the world -- unite!
Joined
Nov 17, 2011
Messages
1,667
Location
Michigan
Haha no! I don't believe it. What was it that happened? What conditions have you been trying to grow them in?

Same conditions as my capensis. Over the summer that translates to lots of fresh air and sun out on my balcony.
 
Joined
Jan 7, 2004
Messages
439
Location
Utah
Same conditions as my capensis. Over the summer that translates to lots of fresh air and sun out on my balcony.

And yet...that didn't work for the tokaiensis...wow! I am surprised unless it was just too much direct sun.

Wonder if mine will bite the dust within the year too. So far, it looks perfectly happy and about to open the flowers or as has been pointed out, most likely NOT open the flowers. We will see!
 
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