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"Long Leaf" Cape Sundew sudden health decrease

Joined
Mar 26, 2021
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Haii everyone.
I recently noticed my young Drosera Capensis "Long Leaf" getting into a much worse condition, the leaves turned dark green then a bit yellowish and the leaves lean onto the ground (It was completely fine 5-15 hours ago)
I think it started very shortly after a recent watering but the other plants which I watered with the same water seems fine (with the exception of a drosera filiformis seedling which might had been in a bad state before too and no other plants in the filiformis' pot seem to have affected)
I think it might also entered dormancy as last night's temperature dropped more than in any previous night ( -4°c / 24°F) for an extended amount of time but I'm not sure what's wrong with it.
The sundew is about 4-7 months old and I took care of it since it was a seed and repotted it into a sphagnum-perlite mix about three months ago and was in these growing conditions :
-3 hours direct daylight, 8 hours indirect daylight (It's the middle of winter right now)
-Pot is about 15cm tall
-Temperature ranges from 3°c to 20°c (it dropped to -4°C during the last night for 6-8 hours
-50% to 70% constant air humidity.
-Soil mix is Sphagnum Moss+Perlite (should be in 45% / 55% ratio)

The sundew looks like this right now
IMAG2646.jpg

Yesterday it was like this
IMAG2625.jpg
 

bluemax

Lotsa blue
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It looks to me like it is reacting to the cold temperatures. D. capensis doesn't really have a proper dormant cycle but it will die down to the ground and, often, recover from established roots. It is best to just keep it from freezing temps.
 
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
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Seems like the weather is the problem thats too cold for it they probably dont like it anywhere below 70 i believe, they are extremely forgiving though, i would just get it to some warmer temps and it should bounce back just fine! And also they dont go dormant. Happy growing :)
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
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Greeley, CO, USA
Below freezing, you will lose all growth that is above ground. If the roots are fine it will return, but any growth will not tolerate frost.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,933
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Seems like the weather is the problem thats too cold for it they probably dont like it anywhere below 70 i believe, they are extremely forgiving though, i would just get it to some warmer temps and it should bounce back just fine! And also they dont go dormant. Happy growing :)
Drosera capensis grows in places that naturally experience frosts, and usually have nighttime temperatures at least in the 50's year round. Above 70 all the time is not their preferred climate.
 
Joined
Mar 26, 2021
Messages
11
Thank you everyone for the help!
I'll try to keep them above freezing point but there was an unexpected sudden temperature drop yesterday, I think my other sundews and venus flytrap seedlings weren't affected cause they were exposed to less of the cold temperature ?

And thank everyone for helping again, I think it should recover in a few months if it was cause from the frost if all of my other plants are fine ?
 
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
Messages
96
Drosera capensis grows in places that naturally experience frosts, and usually have nighttime temperatures at least in the 50's year round. Above 70 all the time is not their preferred climate.
Mine on the other had when it goes below 70 it starts loosing its dew and leaves will brown at the edges if its for more than a day, i think alot of it can come down to how its parent plant was bred ect. Cause plants in captivity and plants in the wild usually bear some different characteristics to an extent. Not saying you're wrong about d capensis i just feel like most people wont expose theirs to frost, but this is just my opinion as i am extremely new too plants in general.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,933
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Mine on the other had when it goes below 70 it starts loosing its dew and leaves will brown at the edges if its for more than a day, i think alot of it can come down to how its parent plant was bred ect. Cause plants in captivity and plants in the wild usually bear some different characteristics to an extent. Not saying you're wrong about d capensis i just feel like most people wont expose theirs to frost, but this is just my opinion as i am extremely new too plants in general.
None of these plants have been bred outside of the wild long enough to establish variance from their natural preferences that much. Your plant reacts because it's experiencing either the usual drop in humidity that goes with temperatures dropping in a household (which is usually the cause of sudden lost dew and burnt leaf tips), or because it's not acclimated to dealing with big changes in conditions.
 
Joined
Oct 4, 2021
Messages
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None of these plants have been bred outside of the wild long enough to establish variance from their natural preferences that much. Your plant reacts because it's experiencing either the usual drop in humidity that goes with temperatures dropping in a household (which is usually the cause of sudden lost dew and burnt leaf tips), or because it's not acclimated to dealing with big changes in condition
Im just saying that there are small variants in plants that have been bred and re bred in captivity than ones growing in the wild small variants and youre right that it hasent been that long to establish variance that much all im saying is that there is some, as for mine i honestly dont know what its deal is because my humidity never ever drops below 60 id average it at 70 percent even when it get below 70 degrees the humidity can be at 84%, but my d capensis just started hating life a few months back even though it is flowering and put out a pretty tall stalk so maybe all the energy is going to the flower im guessing thats what it is even though it has had failed flower stalks before that right as they were about to uncurl they would go black and die..
 
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