What's new

Has anyone? and Can I?

Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
58
Location
Indiana, USA
Has anyone grown either of these types? I'm eyeing them at sunbelle exotics. They are beautiful.*
-S. 'Dana's Delight'
-S. readii #1 Alabama Red -Natural hybrid of (leucophylla x rubra)

But the biggest question is can I grow these successfully in Las Vegas? I've read they need they're winter dormancy with temps. close to freezing. We don't get that cold here. Is there a way around this or am I better with just nepenthes?*
Thank you.

Sent from my LGLS770 using Tapatalk
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
1,496
Location
Oregon
S. "Daina's Delight" (it's commonly misspelled as Dana) is a very common and easy to grow cultivar. There's probably plenty of people around here who grown some clone of S. x readii too. I can't personally advise you about growing Sarracenia in a desert climate, but I do know that people successfully grow them in Arizona. I'd be more worried about the summer heat than high winter temperatures, and you can always put plants in the fridge for dormancy if necessary.
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,677
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
A lot of people do grow 'Daina's Delight' (it was registered as Dana's Delight but was meant to have the other spelling due to a publication error), and I grow S. x "readei" "Alabama Red" (should be x farnhamii ssp. bellii while we're giving out details, as it's likely a rubra gulfensis hybrid), which is a very vigorous and large plant. Both are great plants to try starting out with.
As for growing in the desert, so long as you can provide enough water and give them a decent acclimation period they should be able to grow outside well, or if you have a window that receives more than 6 hours of direct sun that would work as well. If temperatures get below 40 F on at least some decently regular basis then they could stay outdoors all winter, otherwise as people have already stated they can be placed in a fridge when they are approaching time for dormancy.
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
1,496
Location
Oregon
I've heard the same story elsewhere, but the cultivar does not appear to be registered with the ICPS (or else it's an omission on the website.) From what I've read, the original grower has no interest in registering it.
 
Joined
Jun 21, 2016
Messages
58
Location
Indiana, USA
Someone more experienced correct me if I'm wrong but I believe it's pretty much the temperature (the light changes come with the drop in temperature) as it slows the cycle of the plant for a period of rest to help promote new growth when not dormant.

Sent from my LGLS770 using Tapatalk
 
Joined
Aug 17, 2014
Messages
365
Location
South Florida
Someone more experienced correct me if I'm wrong but I believe it's pretty much the temperature (the light changes come with the drop in temperature) as it slows the cycle of the plant for a period of rest to help promote new growth when not dormant.

Sent from my LGLS770 using Tapatalk
If it were temperature controlled, Sunbelle wouldn't be able to grow Sarracenia haha
We still have days up to 85 in December ave they go dormant in November. It's definitely more based on light levels than temperature
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,677
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Photoperiod length triggers dormancy, but cooler temperatures (and drier conditions) really help avoid rot in the middle of winter; if there is sufficient sunlight however, that dormant period may only be a period of weeks rather than months, the obligate rather than facultative dormancy that they absolutely need and then can grow the rest of the year without pause.
Nimbulan: it would seem there is a large umber of plants that have been widely thought to be actually registered cultivars that simply are not, and that's come to my notice several times recently. First was N. "Rebecca Soper" which is incredibly common now but was never an official name, now "Daina's Delight" which I often see reputable nurseries label in cultivar terms, but I cannot find the registration data either (whether published with the CPN or not, the ICPS would have a registry record if it had been); this is unfortunately somewhat dangerous because it means anyone could technically take another plant, entirely different or very similar it would not matter, and register it officially under the same name and by ICRA rules that one would be the correct bearer of the name and the common ones we know now by the name would have to be labeled differently. Or, conversely, someone could take the same plants and register them under the names and remove all credit from the original growers.
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
1,496
Location
Oregon
I've found most nurseries to be inconsistent with cultivar labels, regularly mixing up the quote type. There are also many plants (especially Nepenthes) that commonly have the location data in quotes for some reason.

It really is strange that such widely-distributed plants were never registered, though.
 
Joined
Aug 17, 2014
Messages
365
Location
South Florida
Photoperiod length triggers dormancy, but cooler temperatures (and drier conditions) really help avoid rot in the middle of winter; if there is sufficient sunlight however, that dormant period may only be a period of weeks rather than months, the obligate rather than facultative dormancy that they absolutely need and then can grow the rest of the year without pause.
Nimbulan: it would seem there is a large umber of plants that have been widely thought to be actually registered cultivars that simply are not, and that's come to my notice several times recently. First was N. "Rebecca Soper" which is incredibly common now but was never an official name, now "Daina's Delight" which I often see reputable nurseries label in cultivar terms, but I cannot find the registration data either (whether published with the CPN or not, the ICPS would have a registry record if it had been); this is unfortunately somewhat dangerous because it means anyone could technically take another plant, entirely different or very similar it would not matter, and register it officially under the same name and by ICRA rules that one would be the correct bearer of the name and the common ones we know now by the name would have to be labeled differently. Or, conversely, someone could take the same plants and register them under the names and remove all credit from the original growers.
I think Rebecca Soper and Daina's delight are both trademarked names though
 
Last edited:
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,677
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Neither are trademark names; registry for that would also be noted as the name when sold by nurseries would have to have the "TM" symbol by the name and there would be a record of them being made trademark plants.
And nimbulan: I regularly put locations in quotes, why is this an issue? It is additional information that is not a cultivar name....
 
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
Messages
1,496
Location
Oregon
I find it can be confusing at times, especially as the quoted locations are generally abbreviated and can be difficult to match up to a map. For instance I recently bought a Nepenthes singalana "Tujuh" and have yet to figure out where that location actually is (assuming I'm not wrong and it's not actually a cultivar?)
 

Not a Number

Hello, I must be going...
Staff member
Moderator
Joined
Nov 16, 2006
Messages
7,649
Location
Los Angeles, CA
There was some discussion on "Daina's/Dana's Delight many years ago on the ICPS board and listserv.

CP's & Roses | International Carnivorous Plant Society

It appears Kim Magnusen who hybridized the plant never bothered to file any paper work to register it as a cultivar. He just sent some plants off to a Tissue Culture nursery. From posts about Kim Magnusen it is said his attitude was that he just grows the plants and the plants do all the work. I guess he didn't feel he should take credit for something that Nature has done. Rather refreshing to think there are a few CP growers with that attitude.
 
Top