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Giant and interesting species I might be able to grow

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Aug 25, 2020
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petah tikva, israel
Hey guys. Last time I tried to get info for species I like and might be able to grow I havn't given enough info so you couldn't know which species I could be able to grow. Well, I thought of an idea. I've searched for nepenthes which are known to be able to grow here, as it might give an indication for which species I might be able to grow. The species which are known to be able to grow here are:
Nepenthes ampullaria
Nepenthes alata
Nepenthes ventricosa
Nepenthes truncata
Nepenthes maxima
Nepenthes rafflesiana
Nepenthes sanguinea

Natural hybrids:
Nepenthes Ventrata,
Nepenthes hookeriana

Man made hybrids:
Nepenthes bloody mary
Nepenthes miranda
Nepenthes gaya
Nepenthes lowii × ventricosa
Nepenthes mojito
And probably some more.
I saw people saying Klossii liked growing in lowland conditions, as well as a few other species I really like such as palawanensis, burbidgeae and clipeata. And I wondered, based on the species mentioned above that are known to be able to grow here, which giant species (like palawanensis, attenboroughii, clipeata, mollis, mapuluensis, etc.) Or simply interesting species (such as klossii, aristolochioides, etc.) Which ones do you think could possibly grow here? I can provide half shade, full shade and full sun for the very small species.
 

Bio

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Sounds like you have lowland to warm intermediate conditions. Obligate highlanders are out of the question unless you're willing to provide them with a cooler climate. Fortunately there are some big plants that should do well for you. N. truncata, N. merrilliana, and N. rafflesiana will do well and get massive. N. robcantleyi and N. nebularum might be alright if you can keep them slightly cooler. Things like N. attenboroughii are going to want conditions that I don't think you'll be able to provide without a climate controlled greenhouse, or at least a very large highland terrarium.
 
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Cool, thanks. And what about clipeata, klossii or palawanensis? Merrilliana is pretty cool- seems to be pretty hard to find though. Just to clarify, I meant species with giant pitchers, not the plants themselves.
 

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Cool, thanks. And what about clipeata, klossii or palawanensis? Merrilliana is pretty cool- seems to be pretty hard to find though. Just to clarify, I meant species with giant pitchers, not the plants themselves.
All those species that I listed have very large pitchers.

N. palawanensis seems to be a cool intermediate to highland plant. Might be possible for you, might not.

I always thought N. klossii was another intermediate to highlander, but maybe it'll do well in warm intermediate conditions.

N. clipeata would be great for your conditions, but it's uncommon and pretty expensive. I also wouldn't say that it gets giant pitchers. Large to be sure, but not like N. truncata or N. merrilliana.
 
Joined
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I feel as if we did answer this question at one point in the past. Palawanesis and burbidgeae are not lowland climate plants by any definition. The plants you listed as being known to grow in israel do so because they're very tough and adaptable species. The same is not true of most of the species you're asking about. Stuff like aristo will absolutely not survive your summers.
 
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The thing is, the temperature never got to 40 degrees celsius this year, and it wouldn't be too hot especially if I kept them in bright direct light inside my room. I havn't thought of my room as an option previously, but I think it could provide nice conditions, as it doesn't get neither too cold nor too hot. So if the highland species are out of the list, Clipeata, merrilliana and maybe klossii (?) Could grow in my room. I like all of these species. Which one do you think would fit my room the best?
 
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For highlanders I wouldn't be comfortable letting them get above 30C for extended periods of time. You're also neglecting the night time temperatures. A lot of the highland species you list require significant temperatures drops. Clipeata and klossii may work but merrilliana is a true lowland species and is going to require heating and possibly additional humidity in the winter. If you grow indoors you may need supplemental lights. Windows are glazed to block a significant portion of light from coming inside.
 
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If I grew clipeata or Klossii outside, what would be the best position for them? I thought they couldn't stand full sun, which is why I thought of my room, where I have bright light, as an option. I can provide Full sun, half shade, full shade and indirect, not bright light besides the bright direct light in my room.
 
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I know that clipeata at least can take lots of direct light. Again, if you want specific advice for growing outdoors you'll need to ask the advice of someone who lives in your area or be willing to experiment on your own. None of the rest of us live in Israel and weather forecasts and temperature graphs do not give all the information you need to decide what environment is best.
 
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I'm sure about that. I don't think any of the people in Israel grows clipeata or Klossii, and I've asked the few experienced growers here. That's why I'm trying to gather the best and most close to accurate information from you.
By the way, do you know any reliable seller currently selling clipeata who sells plants worldwide?
 
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The only seller I know of is Wistuba. You'll have to contact them to see what their options for shipping into Israel is.
 
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petah tikva, israel
Ok, thanks. I'm struggling to choose between Klossii and Clipeata, which one do you think would be easier to get into pitchering steadily? And which one is more forgiving and suitable for beginners?
 
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Neither is something I'd recommend to a beginner, they're both expensive plants. If you must go with clipeata, it's cheaper
 
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I have some experience with epiphytic orchids and some more tropical plants like Cacao and coffee, so I'm not entirely new to growing tropical plants. Clipeata isn't currently available at his website, I'll try to ask whether it'll soon be available. Thank you for all of the answers.
 
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petah tikva, israel
Hey. Sorry for bothering you guys, but I'd like to know if you think that Nepenthes rigidifolia and Nepenthes sumatrana which I really like either could grow here, because clipeata seems to be currently hard to find. Thank you.
 
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You will not be able to find rigidifolia, it is only produced by one nursery and they do not do retail sales. Sumatrana needs consistent warm and humid conditions to grow well. I wouldn't try it without a greenhouse
 
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Anyway, it seems to be sensitive and only grow in highland conditions... And another option I thought of is Nepenthes platychilla- the shape of the pitcher and the peristome are cool imo. Is it a good option?
 
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