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Joined
Aug 2, 2005
Messages
451
Location
MIT, Cambridge, MA
actias luna, male

lovely, I used to breed saturnid moths, I have a collection, i'll post preserved actias luna pics in my collection if you'd like...
 
Joined
Mar 3, 2006
Messages
3,116
Location
Spring Feild Ohio
Hey I went to an observatorium in Colombus Ohio, they have exotic Buterflys (INcluding Moths) But They dont let the rare moths Go (Lunar and Atlas) due to the damage they get while in the big Vegitated area.

I dont meen to intrude but it is possible to breed them As they have done it hear!

ca05807d.jpg

b0226d4a.jpg
 

schloaty

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Joined
Jun 21, 2002
Messages
5,378
Location
Westchester County, New York
[b said:
Quote[/b] ]Very cool that you vere able to get pictures of it! How did you come across it?

Kinda funny actually. Was in the local A&P parking lot, and some kid walking past me said "Woah! What is THAT?" Natually I looked to see what the fuss was about. There it was. The poor thing was half dead already. I assume it must have mated and done it's thing for the summer. It held still for the camera due to lack of strength for anything else.

I hatched a cycropia moth once in college - found the cocoon while walking in the woods in February. Darn things are HUGE.

Thanks for all the kind words!

Watch for my next post tomorrow - found a snake eating a toad today.....
 
Joined
Jan 5, 2005
Messages
3,252
Location
New Jersey, USA
[b said:
Quote[/b] (nepenthes_ak @ July 29 2006,11:04)]Hey I went to an observatorium in Colombus Ohio, they have exotic Buterflys (INcluding Moths) But They dont let the rare moths Go (Lunar and Atlas) due to the damage they get while in the big Vegitated area.
As we know from CP, it is virtually never a good practice to introduce non-native species to an area. However - you seem to be saying something about damage ....

While the moths obviously may lay eggs and the caterpillars will munch on their foodplants
- it is rare for the caterpillars of most Saturnids to actually cause significant damage (even to an individual tree). Their population density is typically very low and the eggs are usually spread out. They also are favorite food of almost every bird in existence ...
- its impossible for the adults to cause damage. Their final moth stage has no mouthparts (unlike sphinx & other moths) so they cannot even nectar at blooms. They mate, lay eggs and die ...
[b said:
Quote[/b] ]I dont meen to intrude but it is possible to breed them As they have done it hear!
Eggs & coccoons of many species are commercially available to 'raise'. Some species are easier than others and there are 'tricks' to be learned (as in almost any new endeavor) - but yes you can do it.

Just like a pill - google cecropia images to see if that is the one you saw.
 
Joined
Oct 28, 2003
Messages
1,211
Oughtta give raising the eggs a shot. For anyone curious it is very possible to raise these in captivity.
 

PlantAKiss

Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, Engl
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
10,335
Location
Richmond, Virginia/Zone 7
Nice pics. Its been a looooooooong time since I've seen a luna. They are really beautiful moths.

Schloaty...we seem to be following the same track lately. You found a turtle, I found a turtle. Just last week I found a HUGE moth on my rock bag on the back porch. It was beautiful...bright orange and yellow body. I took pics. After some hunting I identified it. I'll have to post my moth photos. Also have a pic of one I haven't identified yet.
 
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