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Anybody know anything about Nepenthes pitopangii?

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Nov 4, 2016
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Providence, RI
This species is very new in cultivation, so there isn't much information I've been able to find about it. It seems to be considered an intermediate grower in most places, but the type specimen was found at 1800m, and the second population at 1400m, so it seems like it could be a highlander...also, it sounds like it would probably appreciate fairly high light and lots of humidity, like most nepenthes. However, does anyone know if the clones in cultivation are particularly finicky? Also, how fast does the species grow?
 
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Feb 23, 2014
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Based on my experience and from what I have heard from other people I talked to, this plant is finicky and takes a while to settle in.
 
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Apr 19, 2012
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Greeley, CO, USA
There are people getting uppers on seed-grown plants in cultivation now, so it's not particularly new anymore. It's a highlander, related to N. glabrata and somewhat finicky like its relative from what I've gathered. Standard delineation is anything above 1000 m or so is highland, above about 1800-2000 meters is the start of the ultrahighlanders.
 
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Nov 4, 2016
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Above 1000 meters makes sense, I read in the following place that intermediate was 1000 to 1500m, and N. pitopangii has been found at 1400 and 1800m. Good to know that it's finicky, though.

I may just avoid it for now, but does anyone have specific care information? Or do I just basically treat it like any highland plant?

Place I read that pitopangii is intermediate (not trying to argue, but I am sort of confused...maybe it's badly defined :p):

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct...nTOIbNSmV_6OsxlcZnFqVg&bvm=bv.139782543,d.cGw
 

Dexenthes

Aristoloingulamata
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Dec 6, 2008
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Southern Tongass Rainforest, Alaska
I haven't grown N. pitopangii but I have grown N. glabrata and other sensitive highlanders.

Basically the higher you can keep the humidity and the cooler you can get the nights, and the plants will grow (quickly too! [if it's anything like glabrata]). If the humidity is below 80+% and the nights are not cooler than 60-55 degrees, the plants will suffer rapidly.
 
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Nov 4, 2016
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Providence, RI
Thanks Dexenthes! I suppose I shall be avoiding this plant for now then...I was hopeful because I have a highland orchid that's been doing well in my conditions, but I can't keep humidity above 80%. Ah well...
 
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Jun 6, 2008
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SF, CA
The plant can be grown as either an intermediate or as a highlander; and I know of many who successfully grow it under those varied conditions. If one is capable of growing a highland orchid, this species should prove simple to cultivate. Here is a recent shot of that species in vitro . . .

Nepenthes pitopangii 2 December
 
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