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RamPuppy

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Joined
Jul 8, 2001
Messages
2,363
Location
San Antonio, Texas; USA
Ok, I have been growing D. binata out on my patio this spring,  the two plants are doing so well, that with Pyro's help, I expanded to D. binata 'Multifida Extrema', D. binata 'Dichotoma', and D. binata "Marston's Dragon' as well... D. binata and D. binata 'Marston's Dragon' are out and growing, the others are root cuttings...

my question is, these australian dews are taking south texas punishment... what other dews grow around them, if I can have fun with them outside as well, dews just might replace my nepenthes addiction. (I am out of space, so the addiction is kind of taking care of itself.)
 
Joined
Jan 29, 2003
Messages
840
Location
Palm Springs, CA
Ram,
From what I know (could be wrong
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) at least most of the petiolaris group needs a whole lot of heat. And as far as the strength of the sun you have, i'm pretty sure you could grow some pygmies as well.
 
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
538
Location
Senegal
Hi Ram,

So far I have successfully grown Drosera capensis, D. capillaris, D. spatulata, and D. binata outdoors through the summer without problems. I would expect others that might do well are D. brevifolia (aka annua) (which is native to Texas), many australians if it doesn't snow over the winter (just do the summer dormancy thing), and as vertigo said petiolaris complex Drosera, as long as you can maintain the humidity.

I find many Drosera can take higher than ideal heat as long as the soil water level in maintained, especially if they have adequate root space. If the soil substrate has enough mass to act as a buffer, this really helps.

Good luck!

-noah
 
Joined
Sep 16, 2002
Messages
1,390
Location
San Francisco
capensis , definitly capensis . i have one outside right not and its about 100 degrees in so cal right now , and its dewing great
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, its looks like a d. capensis red now .
 
Joined
Dec 8, 2001
Messages
5,290
Location
Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
I suggest you get some seed sown in outdoor conditions. Sundews which are acclimated from the start can TAKE it. I grew Drosera binata, capensis, capillaris long arm, coccicaulis, dielsiana, spatulata NZ, spatulata kanto form, nidiformis, burmannii, aliciae in a bin in 6 inches of mix which sat in about 4 inches of water. The bin was covered by a sheet of glass, and was exposed to full sun for the season. Not only did the plants not cook, they throve, producing some of the best looking specimens I have ever grown. Since I grow my other plants outside in ambient conditions, I have to attribute the success to the increased heat AND humidity. You might have to modify the sunlight received with a white plastic screen (here in upstate NY we het 45% of the available sunlight) but I think the key is starting them outdoors from the start. As far as heat goes, these plants will adjust providing they do not dry out. My bin was underwater for days at a time, and the plants were very happy with this. I have another experiment running not and will keep you posted. A shot of the community bin is the front photo for my website at:

http://home.twcny.rr.com/tamlin/index.html

and a graphics intensive shot of the D. coccicaulis in the bin at:

http://206.103.248.175/tamlin_....s_4.JPG

This is an experiment worth repeating. The critical factors are the deep substrate, abundant water (my bin sat in a wheelbarrow), and HIGH humidity. There was only 3 inches between the glass and the substrate. Only fully acclimated seedlings may be used, or seed germinated in these conditions.
 
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
538
Location
Senegal
Hi Ram,

I live in southern CA, temps hit the low hundreds in the high summer (July August), but are already 85 - 90 now.

Tamlin,

I have worked with various plants outdoors in a cutoff tank, though rarely ( if ever) in full sun (I think only once ,with capillaris.)

What were the highs in the conditions you were describing, both inside and outside the tanks if the info is available.

thanks!

-noah
 

Tim

Joined
Nov 12, 2002
Messages
478
My greenhouse gets to 100, and my capensis, binata in all forms, filiformis, scorpiodies and everything else do very well. Drosera don't to this layman seem to mind radical temperature drops as much as Lowland Neps. Even my Sars are munching out so much on bugs that some of the tubes smell rather "off".
My Mexican Pings also seem to do well, especially if I put them into shadier areas, and my Tillandsias just want to grow and grow.

I can see why orchid types cool their greenhouse, though. My live, but don't really thrive with these temps. My Highland Neps are a sight to behold, with magnificint growth.
 
Joined
Jan 18, 2003
Messages
86
Location
Gilbert, AZ
Is there any chance that I could keep a dew outside in Arizona? The temp today got to 106, and the humidity is very low. I've been thinking about pygmies.
 
Joined
Dec 8, 2001
Messages
5,290
Location
Oswego, New York, U.S.A.
Sundewd,

Although the pygmy species are tough, they do need at least 30% humidity. Two Arizona growers are friends of mine, and they have impressed me with how dry Arizona really is! Hopefully next season I can provide you with some gemmae for experimenting with, and maybe you will be able to add to our knowledge of just how much these plants can take.
 
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