What's new

The Reptile Room

Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,679
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
The collection is no longer snake-dominated, so I think in mind of that a new thread is probably necessary (also since I haven't been posting solely about corn snakes in the other one, about time...).
Been trying out a new technique for the snakeskin jewelry...needs a little work but I think it holds a lot of promise
Shed art by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
When Tsela goes into shed, she turns even more iridescent than usual
Tsela by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
And I have garters again! These are possibly het for amelanistic too, so even more special than the original Cymus and Maya (and showing no problems feeding, so we're not starting off with any sick animals this time).
Cymus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Maya by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Irwin is unquestionably full-grown...but no less cute
Irwin by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Irwin by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Post-shed, in bright phase Domhara
Domhara by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
And...these are the biggest reason why a fresh start is needed. 27 TINY little geckos came to call my room home recently, and they are some of the most adorable things I have ever seen. Best part: unlike the mantises, or even the other lizards, the only thing I need for them now that they have fully bioactive homes is a regular supply of vitamin-dusted fruit flies (and maybe the occasional tiny cricket or mealworm), so feeding is a breeze.
Sphaerodactylus caicosensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Sphaerodactylus caicosensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Gotta be careful with this species in particular though, they're not much for handling and can climb anything...and freely jump from great heights with no care, so holding them up doesn't prevent flying geckos...
Hemiphyllodactylus typus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Sphaerodactylus difficilis diolenius by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Sphaerodactylus difficilis diolenius by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Sphaerodactylus argus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Sphaerodactylus argus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Sphaerodactylus argus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
One of only two that I've actually named so far (most are not mature enough to tell apart by sexes easily, so they look too similar to name), as I only have one...this is Nugget
Sphaerodactylus macrolepis ateles by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
And this is the other, Chimkin
Sphaerodactylus sputator by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Gonatodes albogularis fuscus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Due to photo limit, a few more pics in the next post...
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,679
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
Gonatodes albogularis fuscus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Gonatodes antillensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Gonatodes antillensis by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Gonatodes vittatus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
Many of these geckos will go through dramatic color changes as they mature; females and juveniles often look similar, while males develop very different patterns. Will make telling them apart easier later; these guys for example, will eventually develop brilliant white, black, and golden stripes down their backs if male, and more muted tan and brown stripes in females.
Gonatodes vittatus by Hawken Carlton, on Flickr
And all of these guys, will forever remain tiny. The largest of these geckos will max out at maybe just over 3" long, can eat fruit flies and similar-sized insects their whole lives, and can be kept in male-female pairs in tanks as small as a foot in every dimension. I can't wait to see them start maturing...
 
Top