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Spider ID

Joined
Feb 22, 2014
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Oregon
Those iridescent fangs certainly are unique. It's no match for the peacock spider though!

peacock-spider-1.jpg
 
Joined
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Location
Oregon
I wish that was my picture. Unfortunately, I've never seen one and they don't even live in this country.
 

NemJones

I Am the Terror Of the Night!
Joined
Jun 28, 2014
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Zone 5
Nice shots, everyone. What amazes me about jumping spiders is that they are one of the very few spider groups that actually have good vision and you can tell by the way they respond to things around them. 'Makes them look kind of intelligent to me. I also love the colors some have.
There were a few tests / studies done wtih spiders, predatorial insects, and common bugs.
Their main goal was to measure the intellegence of your general insects. Mazes, hunting, simple problem solving.
They found that spiders, mantids, centipedes and wasps ranked highest on the scales,
With jumping spiders within the top percentage of all tests.
Spiders mostly.
 

bluemax

Lotsa blue
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Vancouver, Washington State, US
I recently saw a post on an arthropod forum that stated that jumping spider females would sometimes act sexually available to males so as to lure them close enough to be grabbed and eaten. Grim but clever. :spidersmile:

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Those iridescent fangs certainly are unique. It's no match for the peacock spider though!

peacock-spider-1.jpg

He has a mustache! Awesome spider.
 

curtisconners

Greetings from the netherworld.
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Feb 7, 2016
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923
Location
Columbus Ohio, U.S.
I recently saw a post on an arthropod forum that stated that jumping spider females would sometimes act sexually available to males so as to lure them close enough to be grabbed and eaten. Grim but clever. :spidersmile:

That's quite possible. Especially when considering the fact that female spiders often eat their mates anyway. :spider: :spidersmile:
 

DragonsEye

carnivorous plants of the world -- unite!
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Nov 17, 2011
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Michigan
That's quite possible. Especially when considering the fact that female spiders often eat their mates anyway. :spider: :spidersmile:

That, by and large, is also an erroneous statement.

Studies done in natural settings have shown that the males of most species do not get eaten -- at least if the male is in good health. It is not uncommon, for example, with many species of the tangled web spiders found around houses for a male to live in the same web as the female for a length of time.

The widespread misconception has been a holdover from early studies done in laboratory conditions. Black widows thus gained an undeserved reputation for killing their mates. Lab conditions are highly unnatural and present a multitude of stresses on organisms which can affect their behavior. In addition, in the wild, males of widow species and those of other spiders are able to leave the web and get t safety after mating. In labs, the males had no where to flee if the need arose....

 
Last edited:
Joined
Feb 22, 2014
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Oregon
It's the same situation with praying mantises as well. The female will eat the male after mating - but generally only if they are kept in captivity. I watched it happen with our class pets in 4th grade...
 

curtisconners

Greetings from the netherworld.
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Columbus Ohio, U.S.
Today actually, serious mantis keepers (yes, that's a thing) give mantises a whole room so that the male can escape. Unfortunately, your 4th grade teacher was not so thoughtful.
 
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