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Joseph Clemens

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An easy species to grow and propagate. I have grown them in acid and basic media, but find I get the best results in a mixture of silica sand/coral - 3::1. Most interesting is that their leaves are attached to their stem by a very easily severed connection. Just the effort of uprooting the plant can begin the process of the plant - falling apart (dropping most of its leaves). They quickly sprout plants from the stem end of these severed leaves, usually several plants per leaf, but it can be annoying if you are just trying to repot or prepare a plant or two for shipping. My guess is that this serves them in natural habitat as a means to distribute themselves when disturbed.


P_reticulata_web_A2.jpg
 
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Is this plant related to the Pinguicula esseriana / P. ehlersiae complex?  Your description reminded me quite a bit of my P. esseriana which seem to shatter apart at even the slightest provocation and give tons of easily rooted leaves.  

Thanks for posting a great photo of a beautiful plant!

Corey
 
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If you think the plants is nice you should see the flower, it's easily one of the most beatiful Ping flowers around. I have found that this species is one of the few Mexican Pings that thrive in a hot, humid terrarium.
 
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PinguiculaMan,
Could you supply more details on cultivating P. reticulata?  I have fair success with other Mexican Pings, but my P. reticulata is barely surviving.  I do have a warm terrarium with lowland Nepenthes.  Do you think it would be happier there?
Thank you,
KPG
 

Joseph Clemens

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I miss the nice pink/red tint to the leaf edges from 16 hour photoperiod, but find I get more flowers with a 9 hour photoperiod.

Here's a photo update of a couple just starting to bloom:

P_reticulata_A.jpg
 
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Hey Pingman:

Have you been experimenting with reduced photoperiods? I thought you cultivated your plants with a steady 16-hour photoperiod all year long? Was there any particular reason you made the change?

Just curious,
Corey
 

Joseph Clemens

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I did reduce the photoperiod on some of my plants, main reason was to see if it would help induce flowering. It appears to have been effective, some plants that hardly, if ever, bloomed before, are blooming more regularly now.
 

jimscott

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Joseph, why do butterworts, or some of them flower when their photoperiod is reduced, while many other plants flower when their photoperiod is increased? I'm sure it's multi-causal, but I thought I would ask one who has observed these plants for 37 years.
 

Joseph Clemens

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It would be related to whatever environmental factors in their natural habitat provide that species with the reproductive advantage(s) they need to survive/thrive. Some of the Mexican Pinguicula have a flowering period in both their summer and winter, others only in one or the other, in cultivation some bloom nearly continuously.
 
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