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N. ampullaria Time Lapse

DavyJones

Is ready to take this hobby to a whole new level
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I liked seeing the bugs ran around on the substrate. These kind of things always amuse me.
 
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@Capensis: That was a small offshoot coming off the main stem of the N. ampullaria.
@bucky78: About 5 weeks
 
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xvart

Doing it wrong until I do it right.
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That's cool. I think my favorite part is the wing development.

xvart.
 
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Very nice time lapse. Why did the film black out in a few places though?

The camera was recording 24 hours a day for over a month. I have my lights on timers for a 13 hour photoperiod. When my lights go off, it's pitch black. On the original file, the lights are shown going off and on dozens of times. I tried my best to edit out all parts in which the lights are off, but it seems some bits slip by without me noticing.
 

nightsky

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I thought it was well done. Interesting how much size the pitcher gained after it had opened. I also watched all those critters scurrying about.

As an aside, most plant timelapses seem to show them 'surging'. I noticed it in your vid on the clover in the background. In the 'jungle' episode of Plant Earth, they do a timelapse and the surging is very prominent. I wonder what causes this?
 
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It's the C4 photosynthesis process that causes the surging.

The C4 cycle is common in tropical plants. Basically, they take in light all day, and put the energy to use during the cooler parts of the day - most often around sunset and sunrise, but also during the night in some C4 plants. This is why Nepenthes need day and night, with highlanders needing a temperature drop to efficiently fix CO2. "C4" comes from the fact that they fix CO2 into four-carbon sugars.

...Whereas most temperate plants have a C3 Calvin Cycle, and can fix CO2 into three-carbon sugars whenever they have the proper lighting and temperatures. Sarracenia have this cycle, so they can grow under 24/7 lighting for years until they get to the size that they need dormancy.





I loved the N. ampullaria timelapse! Keep up the great work!
 
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Yes, and then some. :) The sugars are undoubtedly committed to metabolic processes that build cells and cell walls, rather than simply stored. And then there are the differences in turgor pressure in cells at different times of the day due to different osmotic balances that occur with differences in temperature and when the carbon-fixing process occurs (this is what is causing the already-developed, fully-grown clover leaves to "flap" in the timelapse, but is barely noticeable in the Nepenthes). Temperature controls when the stomata of the leaves open, how effective enzymes are, how much sugar is produced, how much water is absorbed from the roots and relative humidity, how fast the plant can grow, etc. It's really a very complicated process...Plants are way more complicated than what meets the eye - especially when you throw carnivory into the equation!
 
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I watched it again, and I saw...Fungus gnats!!! They're scrambling at the speed of sound!

It's really entertaining to watch them in the time-lapse, but I just can't stand them in real-time in my grow area...
 
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it was 10 mins per pict omg..

Yeah, my camcorder is crap. The longest time interval it would allow me to set was 10 minutes. W/o editing, the time lapse was ~55 minutes long. When i took out all the parts where the lights were turned off, it was 32+ minutes long. Then i sped up the video to 16x.
 

S_Oregon_CP

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Very Nice Work! I need to buy a spare camera and a cord to keep my camera on, and my laptop connected to it to dump the files. So you actually filmed 24hrs a day hmm. Dang. I have tried to timelapse my Capensis circling over a big daddy long leg spider I found. I filmed for only 3hrs and the spider actually moved off screen lol. I should have killed it before I left. I am to merciful.... and yOu! are a great inspiration. thank you for the rad video!
 
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