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Multiple unknown CP's from a local nursery

Joined
Feb 25, 2020
Messages
1
EDIT: Sorry I didn't know the photos were going to be so large!

Hello everyone,

I recently moved out and wanted to bring some life to my new apartment so I went to local nursery about 5 minutes away to pick up some easy to care for houseplants like pothos.

Upon arriving I discovered that they had just received a fresh shipment of carnivorous plants. I have never seen so many beautiful varieties in one place. The most I've ever seen were half dead venus flytraps by the register at Walmart.

I can tell it's a fresh stock because I saw shipment boxes on the ground next to them and the shelves are fully stocked. I used to keep venus fly traps over 10 years ago as a teenager but could never keep them alive for more than a year.

I was wondering if you guys can help me identify a few of them and help me provide the proper care for each species before I go back and buy them. Here it goes!

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There were a few more, but these are by far my faves
 
Last edited:
Joined
May 7, 2019
Messages
97
The Nepenthes from the first pic looks like a N x 'Ventrata' and the second nep looks like a N. sanguinea. The first VFT looks like a 'Dente'-like form. The second flytrap looks like a 'Akai-Ryu'-like form. That dew looks like a Drosera x 'Tokaiensis'. That is the most impressive selection of CPs at a Walmart I've ever seen!
 
Joined
Apr 19, 2012
Messages
4,634
Location
Greeley, CO, USA
The second nep is definitely not sanguinea. Probably an immature 'Miranda', but adult pitchers would be needed. First is certainly "ventrata" The flytraps are typical flytraps; unless they come with a cultivar label you cannot give them one because there are too many far too similar cultivars out there. One might be red and the other green with short teeth, but that's as much of a label as you can give. Sundew is definitely D. tokaiensis (species, not a cultivar, and if flowers are sterile it's technically the ancestral hybrid but is classified currently as var. hyugaensis).
 
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