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Ideas from the cp community to help save cps

Joined
Dec 10, 2002
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Location
Michigan Zone 5 (near Flint)
I am looking for serious ideas on what the average CP grower can do to help stop poaching.

Here are some of mine.

Education of people about the fragile nature of the ecosystems in which CPs grow and the rarity of the plants by sites like this and by CP clubs.

Keeping an eye out for suspicious sales of CPs. Every place that does not specialize in CPs but sells them has had the plant grower on the label from my experience. If they are not labeled we should be asking questions.

Help conservation efforts by jioning organizations like the ICPS or by donating time or money to other conservation groups.

Please add your thoughts. Growing CPs is a lot of fun but seeing them in the wild is so much better! Time is unfortunately running out for a large portion of these plants here and around the world.

Lets try and make a difference, if we don't do it, no one will.
Glenn
 

schloaty

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I wonder if it would be feasable to have a group of volunteers to keep and eye on E-bay....I bet people who poach in small amounts use that to sell their victims....
 
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Manchester, Connecticut
Great suggestions so far.

I always discuss the subject when I give CP talks and when I buy ICPS seeds I contribute $ to the conservation fund.

I will try to make a "100 VFT's Poached" poster for the upcoming NECPS show to appeal to kids and adults. I'd love people's ideas for it - PM me privately. Only 12 days so I really have to get cracking on this.

Wild Bill
 

Ozzy

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I agree with all your ideas. They all are important. Another way that may save alot of plants is to take a look at the two pinned topics at the top of this forum, Greenswamp and Mississippi topics. Give us some ideas, write to the address that are given and let them know how you feel about cp's. Those two sites fate is in their hands, they make the desision whether to destroy or save these sites. Let them know that those sites mean alot to people all over the world. Make your voice heard.

I think this topic should be pinned.
 
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I think we need to go out in our areas and educate people about CPs. If we didn't know that the rainforest had so many creatures in it would we even care about saving it. I think education is the key. I will give a talk and presentation about CPs to an local gardening club. I have created a PowerPoint presentation for that purpose which will cover the many types of CPs. I also an asking local science teachers if they would like to have me come talk to their class about CPs. So just spread the word about these wonderful plants. Like my signature says, "Can anyone see such marvelous things, knowing them to be only plants and feel no wonder?" Well thats my two cents.
 
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I'm joining the ICPS in November!! yippee!!!
biggrin.gif
 
Joined
Dec 10, 2002
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Location
Michigan Zone 5 (near Flint)
I have an idea. Clubs can distribute cities listed native plants (oreos, etc.) and encourage members to propagate these in large quantities and give them away for free.

Having these plants legally available in abundance should take some pressure off of the remaing wild populations!
 
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Atlanta, Georgia (East Atlanta Village)
I think there are several ways that this needs to be approached and most of them have been covered. EDUCATION: Just this week, I was interview by a woman who writes for the New York Times. She is writing about CPs and their gaining popularity. Educating folks about Cps and their plight is good but often increases the demand for these plants.
AVAILABILITY:If they cannot be easily found at a local nursery then the pressure to poach becomes greater. It is a double edged sword. It is hard to get growers to grow a plant that there 'might' be a market for. Tissue culture has become the best way to increase these plants for sale and distibution. Most people will just want a nice plant and not a specific form, hybrid or cultivar. Those selections will be left to speciality growers.

PROTECTION/CONSERVATION:All of us need to do our parts to tell people about CPs and their questionable future if things are not changed. I am fortunate in that I am often asked to lecture to clubs and influential groups and have used this opportunity to spread the word about CPs. I use the stastic that everyday in the rain forest we loose 10 cures for a disease that we don't even know of yet, yet in our own back yards, so to speak, grows a plant that we still know very little about and within that plants' pitcher shaped leaf lives a mite that occurs no where else on earth. What is that mite secreted a substances that was the cure for Parkinson's Disease? This is why we need to save these plants and their eco systems. It would be nice the think that the common folk (opposed to us who are passionate about CPs) would want to save these plants for the shear beauty, uniqueness or intrigue. Some people operate on the premise of, "What's in it of me." This is the angle I use. I will be speaking to 200 heads of the Gardens Clubs of Georgia and two state legislators next week. These women have increbible influence. I WILL be mentioning bog destruction. Randy Zeer's web site has some very disturding pictures of bog destruction that I would like to use for my lecture. They have astounding shock value. Does anyone know him personally?

We all need to do what we can. Every little bit helps. I have 100s of seedlings that I have grown over the last 18 months that I would be more than happy to give for education purposes. PM me if you have such a cause. I will gladly donate them. Good Growing and talk, talk, talk...spread the word.

B-Obsessed
 
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I just finished some things for the big NECPS CP Show tomorrow. Tens of thousands of people visit the Jack O' Lantern event during October where we are having the show - so we are hoping to attract lots of the public.

I created a Conservation poster with paragraphs/pages on the Green Swamp in Danger, VFT Poaching (and artwork of holes in the ground), "What can you do to help". It's great because the poster will stay at the Roger Williams park Greenhouses after the show is over!! I'm hoping we can get a photo of the poster for you all to see.

Also, we will have an ICPS Conservation Fund donation can, and copies of Ozzy's Green Swamp petition.

I hope everyone in the region can come to the show!!

WildBill
 
Joined
Jun 17, 2003
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Hey Folks,

These are all very good suggestions. I'll add a few thoughts on this.

On buying land....unfortunately, this is not a workable solution for most folks or even small nonprofits like the ICPS. You see, in order to have a viable population of plants protected, you have to buy not only the land they live on, but you also have to have some kind of assurance that the things happening off your site will not affect your property. A nearby agricultural facility might be pumping fertilizers/pesticides into the groundwater, and screwing up your hydrology. Your neighbors might not like your yearly prescribed fires. (Air quality concerns could shut you down, too.) So when I hear people say, "Oh,we should buy the land those plants live on," I think to myself...."Well, it's more complicated than that...."

So what can the average person do? First, you can support those conservation organizations that can rally forces enough to do what you want. Sure, the ICPS has a small conservation program. But there are larger national nonprofits you can join and support.

Another important thing you can do is write your local politician every time something comes up that you're concerned about. The more local your politician the louder your voice (so, contacting a county politician on something in his or her jurisdiction may pack a more potent punch than writing the president of the USA). You'd be surprised at how much punch a clearly written, nonprofane, but earnest letter can carry. These politicians do pay attention to these letters. They may not act on each one, but letters from their constituency frighten them!

Doing things like patrolling the net is a great idea. If you see something that looks like a bogus sale on Ebay, email the seller, try to find out what's going on. Sometimes these people will admit that they've got poached plants (never underestimate the stupidity of a criminal!) and if they do that, you can bust them on Ebay.

What can the horticulturist do?

Welllll, first off, keep clean. Do not trade with people who have poached plants.  I know one grower who thinks that poaching is wrong, but has no problem with getting poached seed from another grower. This is wrong. Stay on the very high road, and you'll set a good example for other people. Alas, land managers of rare plants do not like to tell horticulturists where to see rare plants because poaching is so bad. The only way to change that perspective is to change the culture of horticulturists. That means us.

If you have endangered plants, keep records of how you got them. Then, propagate your plants as much as you can, and give them to other growers. Spread the wealth. Make the rare plants as common as dirt (peat?) in collections. This will help decrease poaching pressures.

Also, try to get out into the field from time to time and enjoy the plants in the wild. It will rejuvenate your conservation energies. And while you're out in podunk-wherever, when you stop to get gas or buy lunch, mention to the local (as you hand them your money) that you're sightseeing in the area...that you're there to see the plants in Razorback Hollow (or where ever). Nothing like tourist dollars in the hands of locals to make people value the natural areas in their own back yard!

Just some thoughts!

Later!
 
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Hi everyone -

I finally got back some photos ( and scanned em )from the NECPS show. Here is a pic of the Conservation poster I had created. This was the thing I was most proud of at the show and it felt great everytime I looked over there and saw kids and adults alike reading it. It's now a part of the NECPS educational materials so our members can check it out and use it when they give talks, etc.

The top part was printed on a yellowish paper and I burned the edges with matches. The holes in the ground picture was created from photos, stripped together with an illustration image of the holes I created. The whole thing is on 20 inch by 30 inch black foamboard.

ConsPostWeb.jpg


WildBill
 
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I think this is the most recent version of the text we used:

100 Venus Flytraps Stolen!!
Poached From The Wild

Just a few weeks ago, in late September 2003, approximately 100 Venus Flytraps were illegally poached from Lewis Ocean Bay Heritage Preserve near the Conway/Myrtle Beach area of South Carolina. Anyone with information is urged to call the Department of Natural Resources at 1-800-922-5431. A reward is offered for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible. The stolen plants may have been illegally exported to Europe where they are very popular. Most will die due to lack of proper care making this is a terrible crime because these plants are limited to a VERY small area in the wild. Venus Flytraps only grow naturally within a 100-mile radius of Wilmington, North Carolina and Wild Venus Flytraps could soon be extinct.

Like the rare and endangered Bog Turtle, carnivorous plants are disappearing from the wild. There are very very few places left to see them in nature due to poaching for profit, habitat destruction, and invasive species. In the United States, humans have irreversibly developed 95% of carnivorous plant wetland habitat. These areas have been drained to form golf courses, tree farms, malls, and housing complexes. Some areas have been mismanaged - fires that occur normally have been prevented or put out. Fire naturally opens back up overcrowded crowded habitats for carnivorous plants that survive by springing back from the submerged roots. Other plants, which escaped from people's gardens, can also crowd out native carnivorous plants in the wild. Here in the Northeast an invasive plant species Purple Loosestrife is destroying marshes and bogs ruining carnivorous plant habitats.

_



Wetland Genocide In The South ~ The Green Swamp is in Danger

The Green Swamp, in North Carolina, is an ecosystem second in biodiversity only to the Great Rainforest (a quote from The Nature Conservancy). The Green Swamp is home to Venus Flytraps, Sundews, Pitcher Plants, Butterworts and Bladderworts. 17 different confirmed carnivorous plant species include: Dionaea muscipula, Sarracenia flava, rubra, purpurea, minor, Pinguicula caerulea, lutea, Drosera capillaris, intermedia, filiformis, brevifolia, Utricularia cornuta, juncea, inflata, purpurea, subulata and gibba. In addition to poaching and development, The Green Swamp is facing two enormous threats: 1). The Industrial Paper Company is unmercifully draining this 350,000 acres, has removed the native Long Leaf Pines and hardwoods found in its forested wetlands, and converted this once beautiful place to tree farms and heavy herbicide use with poisonous drift capable of polluting huge areas. 2). A enormous landfill is proposed to be put in the heart of the swamp that will pollute surface and ground water and air of the swamp for eons of time into the future.

"The scariest thing is when you walk in to the swamp and you think how quite and peaceful it is. Then you realize it's too quiet, no birds, squirrels, deer. I have yet to see any live animal other than a few bugs there. This is the only wilderness place I have ever been to and not heard a bird singing. That's something to think about. Most of the land that you see undisturbed is owned by The Nature Conservancy. Thank God that they do or nothing would be left. They burn and manage the land, and try to keep it the way it's supposed to be, full of cp's (carnivorous plants)." Native resident and CP enthusiast, "Ozzy"
____

What Can You Do To Help?

Today, there is no need to steal plants from the wild. There are millions of plants that are raised from tissue culture (TC) and greenhouse culture, as well as extra plants raised by other growers like NECPS members. TC and other "captive bred" plants are probably cheaper and more healthy than those that are poached, so there really isn't any reason at all to poach. You should be suspicious if a plant for sale is not labeled and/or the seller will not say where they got it. Be suspicious of inexpensive full-grown plants offered for trade on online auctions - with minimal effort, you can check around and if it seems too good to be true, it might be poached. You need to know where your plants came from for 2 reasons, 1) to eliminate poaching, and 2) so you know how to care for the plant. The more you know about a plant's native growing area, the more you will fight to preserve it. There ARE groups that work to save these places like the International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS), Nature Conservancy, and Sierra Club.

Organizations:

The Appalachian Mountain Club
www.outdoors.org

The Nature Conservancy
www.nature.org

The International Carnivorous Plant Society (ICPS)
www.carnivorousplants.org/index.html

The Sierra Club
www.sierraclub.org

The Swamp Watch Action Team
www.swampwatch.org

Thanks to Ozzy for his help with this. We also had put out a donation can at the October Show for the ICPS conservation fund. Dave Sackett, NECPS treasurer and I talked about the idea of setting aside a percentage from the monthly plant auction sales for the fund also - but we will need to have an official society vote on it.

WildBill
 

Ozzy

SirKristoff is a poopiehead
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That's very well put together. I think everybody knows that The Green Swamp is my home and it's my number one project. I can't thank you enough for your help. If you ever want a tour of the Green Swamp, I'd Love to give you one.
 
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I've contacted Ozzy on this one (PM) but it probably isn't workable. I suggested for the Federally Endangered sites, to place video cameras activated by motion sensors. I hate being Big Brother, but video cameras would be a silent watcher, and if well hidden, can probably do the job that a person cannot do at this time. It probably isn't economically feasible to do this, but it could catch quite a few unscrupulous people destroying our wetlands plant and animal life. It seems pretty necessary to me, too much has been lost already, we cannot afford to lose anymore. I'd be interested in feedback from anyone.
 

schloaty

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Bugweed,
I think you're right about the ecenomics of it. Unless it were privately funded (when I win Mega Millions, that is), I doubt it would happen. Are there any millionaires on this sight with a burning desire to protect the environment? We just need a few high profile busts, and the word would be out....
 
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The future should be cultivated in the children of today.

Anyone that has children, nephews, nieces, or grandchildren on the boards, donate some CP to your children's science class. Have a minibog/terrarium on permanent display throughout the year.

Donate some plants to the class to take home with instruction sheets(& ICPS link). Word of mouth thing - free advertising.

Have a label with: "http://www.carnivorousplants.org" printed and taped to the display.

Add your own pictures of CP to the display, illustrating the other types of CP in Nature. Some may like one kind and not another.

Maybe have a copy of the ICPS Newsletter on display.

Maybe offer discounts to younger students. They will be the  ICPS members of the future.

Ask local nurseries to place THE ICPS contact info near the plants they sell.

Ask the chains(HD, Lowes, And even W-Mart) to do likewise.

Ask to speak with the manager and explain that increased awareness of CP via ICPS would most likely boost their sales.

Ask online sellers to do likewise.

The main point being - advertising. The use of minimal resources that have wide and pronounced effects.

Try and recruit one(or more) new member a year.

Maybe the ICPS should estimate the fesability of contacting say each state's govenor and instituting the above mentioned CP distribution for grade schools. The ICPS(or others) could raise seeds of several types of CP for the displays. The plexiglass panels at the local chains can make nice display cases.

Maybe it should be made a law that everyone has to cultivate CP. Start an allotment program that pays for CP cultivation. Sorta like the peanut allotment. CP millionaires. "Well, the first thing you know ol' Jed's a CP millionaire. The kinfolks say, 'Jed! How do I become a CP millionaire?'"

Back to me hole,
tweek
 
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I'm new to the forums here and just found this...why has the discussion stopped??

I've been a member of Save the Rhinos International for a little bit and in a way they are doing the same sort of work, but CP fans don't usually need to worry about poachers with machine guns.

STR holds many fundraising events that are both educational and profitable.  They also have the advantage of having an office with paid workers that can afford to devote more time to the cause.  They team up with international companies like Ecko (who has a rhino logo) for fundraisers and do high profile things like have runners in the world's biggest marathon compete in full rhino suits!

I don't know how this can be used for our cause, but there has to be some fun fundraisers we could do.  A CP enthusiast production of Little Shop of Horrors complete with the BEST lobby display and "gift shop" ever!  Maybe a petition or two as well.  I suppose somebody could run a marathon dressed as a nepenthes or something but that is a bit extreme.

Let's figure some stuff out.  This seems to be beyond the scope of existing organizations so we need to think of new stuff to do.
 
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