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Another vft brown leaf question

Joined
Apr 4, 2003
Messages
17
Hi there,

Myvft's are getting plenty of sun, the right water, but have browning leaves, trap head tips (the teeth are turning brown. Is this natural? I know flowers dying is natural, but is this because of too much sun?

On an unrelated topic, I notice this happening to my pitcher plants, too....

Thanks.
 

PlantAKiss

Moderator Schmoderator Fluorescent fluorite, Engl
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
10,335
Location
Richmond, Virginia/Zone 7
Hi Timbuck
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A little more information would help. Where do you live? How much humidity are they getting? How much sun? How hot? How long have you had it and where did it come from (sometimes VFTs bought at places like Lowes have a long history of abuse to recover from).

And what kind of pitcher plant? American or tropical?

I'm sure we can get some help for you.
smile.gif


Suzanne
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2003
Messages
17
Hi again,

I'm in NYC, I'd say the plants get full sun for about five hours a day in 80+ degree weather...
The pitcher plant's American, I believe...

Thanks.
 

NickHubbell

It’s a trap!
Joined
Jul 30, 2002
Messages
1,225
Location
Findlay, OH
Perhaps the humidity is too low during the day. I had a few of my Sarracenia brown on me when my humidity levels dropped during the hottest periods of the day. To help reduce the burning, I moved the plants to an area that was more shaded. This helped reduce the burning. Once the humidity level increased, I moved the plants back to their original location.

Humidity should be around 40%-60% for good growing.
 

Wesley

God must have an interesting sense of humor
Joined
Aug 1, 2002
Messages
1,561
Location
Richmond, VA
If you've got them in trays the water in the tray should be helping the humidity stay up.  And yes if you got the plant at lowes it may (or should I say is) not be used to the humidity, temp., and light change.  It will recover and lose the brownes if you keep it a little more shade and gradually move it to the high lite and temps.

Wes

Also, are you pitcher plants... are the pitchers attached to leaves with a little "chord" attaching the pitcher to the leaf, or are the pitchers coming straight from the base of the plant?  If they come from the base of the plant they're American.  If they are attached to leaf they're tropical.
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Joined
Sep 19, 2002
Messages
1,473
Location
Western MI USA
It sounds like burn/sunskalled. It's just from the heat and intence light combined. The plant will either adapt in time or you can move it to a shadier area/mist it during the heat of the day. Whatever you decide to do, it's not the end of the world to have burn like that, but it is unatractive.
 
Joined
Apr 4, 2003
Messages
17
Hi everyone,

Thanks for your responses. Yes, I definitely have American hybrid pitcher plants. I think the plants are adapting, because they don't seem to be browning much anymore. The pitchers are growing very nicely, so are the vft's...I added a little superthrive to each plant. It seems to have helped. Other than that, I'm trying to grow vft's from seed, too, and I'm not sure if anything's happening...Basically have them in a terrarium, really high humidity, lots of sun and water. Thanks again!
 

Wesley

God must have an interesting sense of humor
Joined
Aug 1, 2002
Messages
1,561
Location
Richmond, VA
Your welcome.

Oh and nice catsbei(sp) Nick. And is that a nep ventricosa? sorry that was off the point.

Wes
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Joined
Aug 27, 2001
Messages
543
Location
UK
Timbuck,
It sounds like your plants have red spider mite infestation. Get an insecticide which contains an acaricide like bifenthrin and spray again 7 days later, Do this in the late evening thoroughly wet the leaves from above and from underneath.

If you want to be sure, look very carefully for tiny dot like creatures moving slowly over the green areas of the newest growth. That is most likely the culprit and not the NYC sun
 
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